scinerds:

Scientists discover the first Earth-sized planet in its star’s habitable zone

Since NASA’s Kepler space telescope launched in 2009, it has found hundreds of new worlds within the Milky Way. Now it has spotted the first planet outside our solar system that could support life. The planet, called Kepler-186f, is located about 500 light-years from Earth and orbits a star similar to our sun. Its orbit is within the star’s habitable zone, the region where temperatures should be neither too hot nor too cold, but just right for liquid water to exist—a precursor for life as we know it. Scientists are unsure if the planet is habitable or what it’s made of, but this discovery proves there are worlds like our own that reside in life’s celestial sweet spot.

Watch the video for a tour of Kepler-186f.

Click through the above images for descriptions.

@1 month ago with 2774 notes
#science #astronomy 
@10 months ago with 2127 notes
#photography #astronomy #science #universe 

Bad Astronomy Facts Archive  

nevver:

  • There are no green stars. (more)
  • While there aren’t green stars, there *are* green objects in space! (more)
  • When 3 celestial bodies align, like in an eclipse, it’s called a “syzygy”.
  • Earth has aurorae, but other planets do too. For Jupiter, its moons play a role: (more)
  • It would take almost 9 years to walk to the Moon. If there were a road 400,000 km long.
  • There are 88 official constellations, the same number as keys on a piano.
  • There’s no real definition of how far over your head the sky starts.
  • On the surface of a neutron star, the gravity is so strong you’d weigh several *billion* tons.
  • There are hundreds of billions of planets in our galaxy. (more)
  • Four planets in the solar system have rings: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. (more)
  • Mars is red due to the presence of large amounts of iron oxide: rust! (more)
  • Over 500 people have flown into space - about 0.000007% of the world’s population.
  • Where “space” starts - the Kármán line - is 100 km above Earth’s surface.
  • The first stars in the Universe formed about 400 million years after the Big Bang. (more)
  • The Earth is warming up. (more)
  • Every time a comet goes around the Sun, it dies a little bit. (more)
  • The Earth is 3.7x the Moon’s diameter, 50x its volume, and 81x its mass.
  • A green aurora is due to electrons recombining with oxygen atoms high in the air. (more)
  • Brown dwarfs aren’t brown. They’re red. Really, really red. (more)
  • If you stand on your tiptoes, the horizon is about 5 km (3 miles) away. (more)
  • Pluto is smaller than our own Moon, yet has (at least) four moons of its own. (more)
  • The core of the Sun is 15 million degrees Centigrade - that’s 27 million degrees F.
  • By combining three equations, you can describe the overall evolution of the Universe. (more)
  • The Moon orbits the earth at a velocity of about 1 km/sec, roughly as fast as a rifle bullet.
@1 year ago with 1121 notes
#astronomy #universe #science 
kqedscience:

Did you know that the total number of individual stars perceptible by the human eye, in all directions in space, is around 6000, give or take depending on how good your eyesight and night vision are?
Read more fun astronomy facts in today’s post from Ben Burress of Chabot Space & Science Center at KQED Science.

kqedscience:

Did you know that the total number of individual stars perceptible by the human eye, in all directions in space, is around 6000, give or take depending on how good your eyesight and night vision are?

Read more fun astronomy facts in today’s post from Ben Burress of Chabot Space & Science Center at KQED Science.

(via afro-dominicano)

@1 year ago with 263 notes
#science #universe #astronomy 

Really Dark Matter: Is The Universe Made Of Holes?
The universe’s missing mass may be locked up in legions of tiny black holes, says a controversial new theory
Most of the matter in the universe gives out no light, or at least so little that it is currently undetectable. Yet we know it is out there because its gravity keeps stars and galaxies in their orbits. Pretty much everyone thinks that this so-called dark matter is made of hitherto undiscovered subatomic particles. Physicists are hopeful they will find a candidate in high-speed collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, near Geneva, Switzerland.
But could we have got dark matter all wrong? Mike Hawkins thinks so. He believes that rather than particles, what we call dark matter is actually legions of black holes created shortly after the big bang.

Really Dark Matter: Is The Universe Made Of Holes?

The universe’s missing mass may be locked up in legions of tiny black holes, says a controversial new theory

Most of the matter in the universe gives out no light, or at least so little that it is currently undetectable. Yet we know it is out there because its gravity keeps stars and galaxies in their orbits. Pretty much everyone thinks that this so-called dark matter is made of hitherto undiscovered subatomic particles. Physicists are hopeful they will find a candidate in high-speed collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, near Geneva, Switzerland.

But could we have got dark matter all wrong? Mike Hawkins thinks so. He believes that rather than particles, what we call dark matter is actually legions of black holes created shortly after the big bang.

(via myheadisweak)

@2 years ago with 81 notes
#Astronomy #Astrophysics #Dark matter #Physics #Science 

The Mark of a Dying Star
Six hundred and fifty light-years away in the constellation Aquarius, a dead star about the size of Earth, is refusing to fade away peacefully. In death, it is spewing out massive amounts of hot gas and intense ultraviolet radiation, creating a spectacular object called a “planetary nebula.”
In this false-color image, NASA’s Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes have teamed up to capture the complex structure of the object, called the Helix nebula, in unprecedented detail. The composite picture is made up of visible data from Hubble and infrared data from Spitzer.
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ESA

The Mark of a Dying Star

Six hundred and fifty light-years away in the constellation Aquarius, a dead star about the size of Earth, is refusing to fade away peacefully. In death, it is spewing out massive amounts of hot gas and intense ultraviolet radiation, creating a spectacular object called a “planetary nebula.”

In this false-color image, NASA’s Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes have teamed up to capture the complex structure of the object, called the Helix nebula, in unprecedented detail. The composite picture is made up of visible data from Hubble and infrared data from Spitzer.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ESA

(Source: afro-dominicano, via myheadisweak)

@2 years ago with 51 notes
#Science #Astronomy 

"(Space programs are) a force operating on educational pipelines that stimulate the formation of scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians… They’re the ones that make tomorrow come. The foundations of economies… issue forth from investments we make in science and technology."

Neil deGrasse Tyson (via myheadisweak)

(Source: afro-dominicano, via myheadisweak)

@2 years ago with 51 notes
#Science #Education #Technology #Space #Astronomy 

White Holes

A white hole, in general relativity, is a hypothetical region of spacetime which cannot be entered from the outside, but from which matter and light may escape. In this sense it is the reverse of a black hole, which can be entered from the outside, but from which nothing, including light, may escape. (However, it is theoretically possible for a traveler to enter a rotating black hole, avoid the singularity, and travel into a rotating white hole which allows the traveler to escape into another universe.)

Like black holes, white holes have properties like mass, charge, and angular momentum. They attract matter like any other mass, but objects falling towards a white hole would never actually reach the white hole’s event horizon.

See also; Event Horizons

(Source: afro-dominicano, via myheadisweak)

@2 years ago with 5576 notes
#Science #Physics #Astronomy #Universe #White holes 
barn-animals:

easy-livin-in-a-flowers-daydream:

bump-an-grind:

What it might look like if Earth was destroyed by a black hole.

Holy fuck

PLEASE NO

barn-animals:

easy-livin-in-a-flowers-daydream:

bump-an-grind:

What it might look like if Earth was destroyed by a black hole.

Holy fuck

PLEASE NO

(Source: zerostatereflex, via figurativezombie)

@2 months ago with 250348 notes
#astronomy 

myampgoesto11:

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2013 Competition Shortlist

Run by the Royal Observatory Greenwich in association with Sky at Night Magazine.

The 2013 shortlist was chosen from a record number of over 1,200 entries from amateurs and professional photographers from around the globe, with all entries to the competition were submitted via a dedicated Flickr group .

Click the link to see the full list and more info on each entry

via Huffpost Tech UK

(via afro-dominicano)

@11 months ago with 5519 notes
#photography #astronomy #universe 
nevver:

Astronomy Picture of the Day
@1 year ago with 932 notes
#astronomy #photography 

Moon & Stars
Something you don’t see too often, a detailed picture of the full Moon surrounded by a rich field of background stars. It’s true that bright moonlight scattered by the atmosphere tends to mask faint stars, but pictures of the sunlit portion of the Moon made with earthbound telescopes or even with cameras on the lunar surface often fail to show any background stars at all. Why? Because the exposure times are too short. Very short exposures, lasting fractions of a second, are required to accurately record an image of the bright lunar surface.
Composite Image Credit: T.A. Rector, I.P. Dell’Antonio, NOAO, AURA, NSF

Moon & Stars

Something you don’t see too often, a detailed picture of the full Moon surrounded by a rich field of background stars. It’s true that bright moonlight scattered by the atmosphere tends to mask faint stars, but pictures of the sunlit portion of the Moon made with earthbound telescopes or even with cameras on the lunar surface often fail to show any background stars at all. Why? Because the exposure times are too short. Very short exposures, lasting fractions of a second, are required to accurately record an image of the bright lunar surface.

Composite Image Credit: T.A. Rector, I.P. Dell’Antonio, NOAO, AURA, NSF

(Source: afro-dominicano, via myheadisweak)

@2 years ago with 261 notes
#Astronomy #Moon #Science #Stars 

NGC602
Distance: 196,000 light-years
Near the outskirts of the Small Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy some 200 thousand light-years distant, lies 5 million year young star cluster NGC 602. Surrounded by natal gas and dust, NGC 602 is featured in this stunning Hubble image of the region. Fantastic ridges and swept back shapes strongly suggest that energetic radiation and shock waves from NGC 602’s massive young stars have eroded the dusty material and triggered a progression of star formation moving away from the cluster’s center.
Credit: Robert Gendler

NGC602

Distance: 196,000 light-years

Near the outskirts of the Small Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy some 200 thousand light-years distant, lies 5 million year young star cluster NGC 602. Surrounded by natal gas and dust, NGC 602 is featured in this stunning Hubble image of the region. Fantastic ridges and swept back shapes strongly suggest that energetic radiation and shock waves from NGC 602’s massive young stars have eroded the dusty material and triggered a progression of star formation moving away from the cluster’s center.

Credit: Robert Gendler

(Source: afro-dominicano, via myheadisweak)

@2 years ago with 45 notes
#Astronomy #Science #NGC602 #SMC #Stars #Star cluster 

Hubble Catches Titan Chasing Its Shadow
This movie still shows Titan chasing its shadow across Saturn’s disk. The still is from a movie created from images taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. It reveals the planet’s rings tipped nearly edge-on toward the Earth.
Credit: NASA, ESA, and E. Karkoschka (University of Arizona)

Hubble Catches Titan Chasing Its Shadow

This movie still shows Titan chasing its shadow across Saturn’s disk. The still is from a movie created from images taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. It reveals the planet’s rings tipped nearly edge-on toward the Earth.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and E. Karkoschka (University of Arizona)

(Source: afro-dominicano, via myheadisweak)

@2 years ago with 43 notes
#Astronomy #Hubble #Saturn #Science #Titan 

Fundamentals of The Multiverse

Images: Conceptual renderings of what Multiverses might look like

Andrei Linde at Stanford has brought forward the cosmological model of a multiverse, which he calls the “self-reproducing inflationary universe.” The theory is based on Alan Guth’s inflation model, and it includes multiple universes woven together in some kind of spacetime foam. Each universe exists in a closed volume of space and time. Linde’s model, based on advanced principles of quantum physics, defies easy visualisation. Quite simplified, it suggests quantum fluctuations in the universe’s inflationary expansion period to have a wavelike character. Linde theorises that these waves can “freeze” atop one another, thus magnifying their effect.

The stacked-up quantum waves can in turn create such intense disruptions in scalar fields -the underlying fields that determine the behaviour of elementary particles- that they exceed a critical mass and start procreating new inflationary domains. The multiverse, Linde contends, is like a growing fractal, sprouting inflationary domains, with each domain spreading and cooling into a new universe.

If Linde is correct, our universe is just one of the sprouts. The theory neatly straddles two ancient ideas about the universe: that it had a definite beginning, and that it had existed forever. In Linde’s view, each particular part of the multiverse, including our part, began from a singularity somewhere in the past, but that singularity was just one of an endless series that was spawned before it and will continue after it.

(Source: afro-dominicano, via myheadisweak)

@2 years ago with 664 notes
#Astronomy #Astrophysics #Cosmology #Multiverse #Science 
1 month ago
#science #astronomy 
barn-animals:

easy-livin-in-a-flowers-daydream:

bump-an-grind:

What it might look like if Earth was destroyed by a black hole.

Holy fuck

PLEASE NO
2 months ago
#astronomy 
10 months ago
#photography #astronomy #science #universe 
11 months ago
#photography #astronomy #universe 
Bad Astronomy Facts Archive →

nevver:

  • There are no green stars. (more)
  • While there aren’t green stars, there *are* green objects in space! (more)
  • When 3 celestial bodies align, like in an eclipse, it’s called a “syzygy”.
  • Earth has aurorae, but other planets do too. For Jupiter, its moons play a role: (more)
  • It would take almost 9 years to walk to the Moon. If there were a road 400,000 km long.
  • There are 88 official constellations, the same number as keys on a piano.
  • There’s no real definition of how far over your head the sky starts.
  • On the surface of a neutron star, the gravity is so strong you’d weigh several *billion* tons.
  • There are hundreds of billions of planets in our galaxy. (more)
  • Four planets in the solar system have rings: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. (more)
  • Mars is red due to the presence of large amounts of iron oxide: rust! (more)
  • Over 500 people have flown into space - about 0.000007% of the world’s population.
  • Where “space” starts - the Kármán line - is 100 km above Earth’s surface.
  • The first stars in the Universe formed about 400 million years after the Big Bang. (more)
  • The Earth is warming up. (more)
  • Every time a comet goes around the Sun, it dies a little bit. (more)
  • The Earth is 3.7x the Moon’s diameter, 50x its volume, and 81x its mass.
  • A green aurora is due to electrons recombining with oxygen atoms high in the air. (more)
  • Brown dwarfs aren’t brown. They’re red. Really, really red. (more)
  • If you stand on your tiptoes, the horizon is about 5 km (3 miles) away. (more)
  • Pluto is smaller than our own Moon, yet has (at least) four moons of its own. (more)
  • The core of the Sun is 15 million degrees Centigrade - that’s 27 million degrees F.
  • By combining three equations, you can describe the overall evolution of the Universe. (more)
  • The Moon orbits the earth at a velocity of about 1 km/sec, roughly as fast as a rifle bullet.
1 year ago
#astronomy #universe #science 
nevver:

Astronomy Picture of the Day
1 year ago
#astronomy #photography 
kqedscience:

Did you know that the total number of individual stars perceptible by the human eye, in all directions in space, is around 6000, give or take depending on how good your eyesight and night vision are?
Read more fun astronomy facts in today’s post from Ben Burress of Chabot Space & Science Center at KQED Science.
1 year ago
#science #universe #astronomy 

Moon & Stars
Something you don’t see too often, a detailed picture of the full Moon surrounded by a rich field of background stars. It’s true that bright moonlight scattered by the atmosphere tends to mask faint stars, but pictures of the sunlit portion of the Moon made with earthbound telescopes or even with cameras on the lunar surface often fail to show any background stars at all. Why? Because the exposure times are too short. Very short exposures, lasting fractions of a second, are required to accurately record an image of the bright lunar surface.
Composite Image Credit: T.A. Rector, I.P. Dell’Antonio, NOAO, AURA, NSF
2 years ago
#Astronomy #Moon #Science #Stars 

Really Dark Matter: Is The Universe Made Of Holes?
The universe’s missing mass may be locked up in legions of tiny black holes, says a controversial new theory
Most of the matter in the universe gives out no light, or at least so little that it is currently undetectable. Yet we know it is out there because its gravity keeps stars and galaxies in their orbits. Pretty much everyone thinks that this so-called dark matter is made of hitherto undiscovered subatomic particles. Physicists are hopeful they will find a candidate in high-speed collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, near Geneva, Switzerland.
But could we have got dark matter all wrong? Mike Hawkins thinks so. He believes that rather than particles, what we call dark matter is actually legions of black holes created shortly after the big bang.
2 years ago
#Astronomy #Astrophysics #Dark matter #Physics #Science 

NGC602
Distance: 196,000 light-years
Near the outskirts of the Small Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy some 200 thousand light-years distant, lies 5 million year young star cluster NGC 602. Surrounded by natal gas and dust, NGC 602 is featured in this stunning Hubble image of the region. Fantastic ridges and swept back shapes strongly suggest that energetic radiation and shock waves from NGC 602’s massive young stars have eroded the dusty material and triggered a progression of star formation moving away from the cluster’s center.
Credit: Robert Gendler
2 years ago
#Astronomy #Science #NGC602 #SMC #Stars #Star cluster 

The Mark of a Dying Star
Six hundred and fifty light-years away in the constellation Aquarius, a dead star about the size of Earth, is refusing to fade away peacefully. In death, it is spewing out massive amounts of hot gas and intense ultraviolet radiation, creating a spectacular object called a “planetary nebula.”
In this false-color image, NASA’s Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes have teamed up to capture the complex structure of the object, called the Helix nebula, in unprecedented detail. The composite picture is made up of visible data from Hubble and infrared data from Spitzer.
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ESA
2 years ago
#Science #Astronomy 

Hubble Catches Titan Chasing Its Shadow
This movie still shows Titan chasing its shadow across Saturn’s disk. The still is from a movie created from images taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. It reveals the planet’s rings tipped nearly edge-on toward the Earth.
Credit: NASA, ESA, and E. Karkoschka (University of Arizona)
2 years ago
#Astronomy #Hubble #Saturn #Science #Titan 
"(Space programs are) a force operating on educational pipelines that stimulate the formation of scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians… They’re the ones that make tomorrow come. The foundations of economies… issue forth from investments we make in science and technology."
Neil deGrasse Tyson (via myheadisweak)

(Source: afro-dominicano, via myheadisweak)

2 years ago
#Science #Education #Technology #Space #Astronomy 
2 years ago
#Astronomy #Astrophysics #Cosmology #Multiverse #Science 
2 years ago
#Science #Physics #Astronomy #Universe #White holes