lookwhatistole:


bradfordp:

Dubai

Absurdity, insanity, humanity

lookwhatistole:

bradfordp:

Dubai

Absurdity, insanity, humanity

(via bbook)

@3 years ago with 1154 notes
#city #clouds #photography #nature 
(via uselesstrinkets)
@4 years ago with 2 notes
#city #skyline 
(via asaucerfulofcobras)
@4 years ago with 3 notes
#city #skyline 
desirnoir:

(via nanarobinson)
@4 years ago
#city #skyline 
crashinglybeautiful:

nevver:

Brooklyn Bridge, 1903
@4 years ago with 211 notes
#city #skyline #bridge 
(via desirnoir)

(via desirnoir)

@4 years ago with 1 note
#city #landscape 
crashinglybeautiful:

tartanspartan:

Atomic Sky, New York — William Klein, 1955

crashinglybeautiful:

tartanspartan:

Atomic Sky, New York — William Klein, 1955

@4 years ago with 29 notes
#skyline #city #new york 
markcoatney:


laphamsquarterly:

In 1820 a little-known architect named Thomas Wilson proposed a plan for “a metropolitan cemetery on a scale commensurate with the necessities of the largest city in the world, embracing prospectively the demands of centuries, sufficiently capacious to receive five million of the dead, where they may repose in perfect security, without interfering with the comfort, the health, the business, the property, or the pursuits of the living.” What he proposed, in short, was a massive pyramid, its base covering eighteen acres and its height well above that of St. Peter’s Cathedral—a metropolitan sepulcher, a skyscraper for the dead. —From Colin Dickey’s new Roundtable post, “Skyscrapers of the Dead.” His essay, “Necropolis,” on cemeteries and urban spaces, is featured in our Fall 2010 issue on The City. 

markcoatney:

laphamsquarterly:

In 1820 a little-known architect named Thomas Wilson proposed a plan for “a metropolitan cemetery on a scale commensurate with the necessities of the largest city in the world, embracing prospectively the demands of centuries, sufficiently capacious to receive five million of the dead, where they may repose in perfect security, without interfering with the comfort, the health, the business, the property, or the pursuits of the living.” What he proposed, in short, was a massive pyramid, its base covering eighteen acres and its height well above that of St. Peter’s Cathedral—a metropolitan sepulcher, a skyscraper for the dead.

—From Colin Dickey’s new Roundtable post, “Skyscrapers of the Dead.” His essay, “Necropolis,” on cemeteries and urban spaces, is featured in our Fall 2010 issue on The City. 

(via bbook)

@3 years ago with 270 notes
#death #architecture #city 

"City life is millions of people being lonesome together."

Henry David Thoreau (via nocontest) (via fuckyeahthoreau)
@4 years ago with 143 notes
#henry david thoreau #city 
nevver:

Gotham
@4 years ago with 81 notes
#city 
lastchatwithphontaine:

nihilnoetia:

unknown
@4 years ago with 13 notes
#city 
(via desirnoir)

(via desirnoir)

@4 years ago with 2 notes
#city #landscape 
desirnoir:

The forest of concrete trees where human is far away from nature and isolated from each other; the city is waking up.

desirnoir:

The forest of concrete trees where human is far away from nature and isolated from each other; the city is waking up.

@4 years ago with 1 note
#city #landscape 
underfundig:

at all (via MoreInterpretations)
@4 years ago with 3 notes
#city #skyline 
lookwhatistole:


bradfordp:

Dubai

Absurdity, insanity, humanity
3 years ago
#city #clouds #photography #nature 
markcoatney:


laphamsquarterly:

In 1820 a little-known architect named Thomas Wilson proposed a plan for “a metropolitan cemetery on a scale commensurate with the necessities of the largest city in the world, embracing prospectively the demands of centuries, sufficiently capacious to receive five million of the dead, where they may repose in perfect security, without interfering with the comfort, the health, the business, the property, or the pursuits of the living.” What he proposed, in short, was a massive pyramid, its base covering eighteen acres and its height well above that of St. Peter’s Cathedral—a metropolitan sepulcher, a skyscraper for the dead. —From Colin Dickey’s new Roundtable post, “Skyscrapers of the Dead.” His essay, “Necropolis,” on cemeteries and urban spaces, is featured in our Fall 2010 issue on The City. 
3 years ago
#death #architecture #city 
(via uselesstrinkets)
4 years ago
#city #skyline 
"City life is millions of people being lonesome together."
Henry David Thoreau (via nocontest) (via fuckyeahthoreau)
4 years ago
#henry david thoreau #city 
(via asaucerfulofcobras)
4 years ago
#city #skyline 
nevver:

Gotham
4 years ago
#city 
desirnoir:

(via nanarobinson)
4 years ago
#city #skyline 
lastchatwithphontaine:

nihilnoetia:

unknown
4 years ago
#city 
crashinglybeautiful:

nevver:

Brooklyn Bridge, 1903
4 years ago
#city #skyline #bridge 
(via desirnoir)
4 years ago
#city #landscape 
(via desirnoir)
4 years ago
#city #landscape 
desirnoir:

The forest of concrete trees where human is far away from nature and isolated from each other; the city is waking up.
4 years ago
#city #landscape 
crashinglybeautiful:

tartanspartan:

Atomic Sky, New York — William Klein, 1955
4 years ago
#skyline #city #new york 
underfundig:

at all (via MoreInterpretations)
4 years ago
#city #skyline