colchrishadfield:

Listen to the sound of interstellar space. Voyager recorded vibrations in ionized gas. Odd that it’s rising.

@2 months ago with 527 notes
#space #science #NASA 

31262:

Flight to the edge of space in a Lockheed U-2, by Christopher Michel.

(Source)

(via crookedindifference)

@3 months ago with 2319 notes
#space #science 
@4 months ago with 1619 notes
#science #space #ISS 
philosophy-of-praxis:

note-a-bear:

inothernews:

npr:


It might make the astronaut wearing it look like a real-life Buzz Lightyear, but a new prototype spacesuit that NASA just finished testing represents the first major overhaul in spacesuit technology since 1998.

(via New NASA Spacesuit Looks like Buzz Lightyear’s | Z-1 Prototype Photos)
Photo: NASA

“Moon rocks?  On a soundstage???”

If they say it’s incidental, I name them liars.

Well it wouldn’t be the first time.

philosophy-of-praxis:

note-a-bear:

inothernews:

npr:

It might make the astronaut wearing it look like a real-life Buzz Lightyear, but a new prototype spacesuit that NASA just finished testing represents the first major overhaul in spacesuit technology since 1998.

(via New NASA Spacesuit Looks like Buzz Lightyear’s | Z-1 Prototype Photos)

Photo: NASA

“Moon rocks?  On a soundstage???”

If they say it’s incidental, I name them liars.

Well it wouldn’t be the first time.

image

image

(via ceborgia)

@1 year ago with 2528 notes
#space #science 
thedailywhat:

A Rare Total Solar Eclipse Takes Over the Night Skies in Australia

Photographed by former NASA photographer Ben Cooper in Queensland, Australia.

thedailywhat:

A Rare Total Solar Eclipse Takes Over the Night Skies in Australia

@1 year ago with 3061 notes
#NASA #solar eclipse #space #universe 
The basis for all life.
Two extremely bright stars illuminate a greenish mist in this and other images from the new GLIMPSE360 survey. This fog is comprised of hydrogen and carbon compounds called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are found right here on Earth in sooty vehicle exhaust and on charred grills. In space, PAHs form in the dark clouds that give rise to stars. These molecules provide astronomers a way to visualize the peripheries of gas clouds and study their structures in great detail. PAHs are not actually “green;” a representative color coding in these images lets scientists observe PAHs glow in the infrared light that Spitzer sees, and which is invisible to us.

The basis for all life.

Two extremely bright stars illuminate a greenish mist in this and other images from the new GLIMPSE360 survey. This fog is comprised of hydrogen and carbon compounds called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are found right here on Earth in sooty vehicle exhaust and on charred grills. In space, PAHs form in the dark clouds that give rise to stars. These molecules provide astronomers a way to visualize the peripheries of gas clouds and study their structures in great detail. PAHs are not actually “green;” a representative color coding in these images lets scientists observe PAHs glow in the infrared light that Spitzer sees, and which is invisible to us.

@2 years ago with 6 notes
#universe #science #space 
theantidote:


Cassiopeia A
Cassiopeia A is the remnant of a supernova explosion that occured over 300 years ago in our Galaxy, at a distance of about 11,000 light years from us. Its name is derived from the constellation in which it is seen: Cassiopeia, the Queen. A supernova is the explosion that occurs at the end of a massive star’s life; and Cassiopeia A is the expanding shell of material that remains from such an explosion. This radio image of Cassiopeia A was created with the National Science Foundation’s Very Large Array telescope in New Mexico. This image was made at 3 different frequencies: 1.4 GHz (L band), 5.0 GHz (C band), and 8.4 GHz (X band). Cassiopeia A is one of the brightest radio sources in the sky, and has been a popular target of study for radio astronomers for decades. The material that was ejected from the supernova explosion can be seen in this image as bright filaments.
Credit: NRAO/AUI

(via krestinaholodov:)

theantidote:

Cassiopeia A

Cassiopeia A is the remnant of a supernova explosion that occured over 300 years ago in our Galaxy, at a distance of about 11,000 light years from us. Its name is derived from the constellation in which it is seen: Cassiopeia, the Queen. A supernova is the explosion that occurs at the end of a massive star’s life; and Cassiopeia A is the expanding shell of material that remains from such an explosion. This radio image of Cassiopeia A was created with the National Science Foundation’s Very Large Array telescope in New Mexico. This image was made at 3 different frequencies: 1.4 GHz (L band), 5.0 GHz (C band), and 8.4 GHz (X band). Cassiopeia A is one of the brightest radio sources in the sky, and has been a popular target of study for radio astronomers for decades. The material that was ejected from the supernova explosion can be seen in this image as bright filaments.

Credit: NRAO/AUI

(via krestinaholodov:)

(Source: afro-dominicano)

@2 years ago with 151 notes
#space #universe #science 

photojojo:

Just a few heavenly photos from the 2011 Astronomy Photographer of the Year contest.

Photos: Milky Way by Tunc Tezel, Lunar Eclipse by Jathin Premjilth, Star Trails by Nicole Sullivan, Hunting Moon by Jean-Baptist Feldmann; via National Geographic

@2 years ago with 908 notes
#astronomy #photography #science #space 
xlenc:

A four-hour exposure photograph of the 1998 Leonids meteor shower taken at the Modra Observatory in Slovakia.
[via]

xlenc:

A four-hour exposure photograph of the 1998 Leonids meteor shower taken at the Modra Observatory in Slovakia.

[via]

(via rnxd)

@2 months ago with 18346 notes
#space #science 
guardian:

In 1972 Apollo 17 astronaut Captain Eugene Cernan became the last man on the moon. His story is told by director Mark Craig in Last Man on the Moon, a documentary screening at this year’s Sheffield Doc/Fest.
Craig shows the Apollo astronauts – now in their 80s – recalling an era when America had a presidential mandate to be daring, a license to venture into the unknown. Read more

guardian:

In 1972 Apollo 17 astronaut Captain Eugene Cernan became the last man on the moon. His story is told by director Mark Craig in Last Man on the Moon, a documentary screening at this year’s Sheffield Doc/Fest.

Craig shows the Apollo astronauts – now in their 80s – recalling an era when America had a presidential mandate to be daring, a license to venture into the unknown. Read more

(Source: theguardian.com)

@3 months ago with 97 notes
#nasa #space 
@1 year ago with 1593 notes
#space #photography 

How Many People Are In Space Right Now? 

@1 year ago with 376 notes
#space #universe #science 

"If space-junk is the human debris that litters the universe Junk-Space is the residue mankind leaves on the planet… It replaces hierarchy with accumulation, composition with addition. More and more, more is more… Instead of development, it offers entropy… Traffic is Junkspace, from airspace to the subway; the entire highway system is Junkspace, a vast potential utopia clogged by its users… Fascism minus dictator… Junkspace will be our tomb. Half of mankind pollutes to produce, the other half pollutes to consume… Junkspace is political: It depends on the central removal of the critical faculty in the name of comfort and pleasure… Will Junkspace invade the body?"

@2 years ago with 117 notes
#space #science 
theantidote:

Space Junk Problem Reaches Tipping Point
It’s bad news for all you aspiring space tourists out there. Soon, the only ticket into space may be of the suborbital variety and nothing more ambitious, like actually flying into orbit. Earth is now surrounded by so much space junk that a leading expert  on the issue has declared that we are at a “tipping point” — it may  soon become too dangerous to venture into low-Earth orbit (LEO) through  fear of having a manned spaceship punctured or a communications  satellite trashed.
[Read more]
Ian O’Neill on the nightmare scenario of the Space Age. Via: discoverynews
(via kateoplis:)

theantidote:

Space Junk Problem Reaches Tipping Point

It’s bad news for all you aspiring space tourists out there. Soon, the only ticket into space may be of the suborbital variety and nothing more ambitious, like actually flying into orbit. Earth is now surrounded by so much space junk that a leading expert on the issue has declared that we are at a “tipping point” — it may soon become too dangerous to venture into low-Earth orbit (LEO) through fear of having a manned spaceship punctured or a communications satellite trashed.

[Read more]

Ian O’Neill on the nightmare scenario of the Space Age. Via: discoverynews

(via kateoplis:)

@2 years ago with 546 notes
#science #space 

"(Space programs are) a force operating on educational pipelines that stimulate the formation of scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians… They’re the ones that make tomorrow come. The foundations of economies… issue forth from investments we make in science and technology."

Neil deGrasse Tyson (via myheadisweak)

(Source: afro-dominicano, via myheadisweak)

@2 years ago with 51 notes
#Science #Education #Technology #Space #Astronomy 
2 months ago
#space #science #NASA 
xlenc:

A four-hour exposure photograph of the 1998 Leonids meteor shower taken at the Modra Observatory in Slovakia.
[via]
2 months ago
#space #science 
3 months ago
#space #science 
guardian:

In 1972 Apollo 17 astronaut Captain Eugene Cernan became the last man on the moon. His story is told by director Mark Craig in Last Man on the Moon, a documentary screening at this year’s Sheffield Doc/Fest.
Craig shows the Apollo astronauts – now in their 80s – recalling an era when America had a presidential mandate to be daring, a license to venture into the unknown. Read more
3 months ago
#nasa #space 
4 months ago
#science #space #ISS 
1 year ago
#space #photography 
philosophy-of-praxis:

note-a-bear:

inothernews:

npr:


It might make the astronaut wearing it look like a real-life Buzz Lightyear, but a new prototype spacesuit that NASA just finished testing represents the first major overhaul in spacesuit technology since 1998.

(via New NASA Spacesuit Looks like Buzz Lightyear’s | Z-1 Prototype Photos)
Photo: NASA

“Moon rocks?  On a soundstage???”

If they say it’s incidental, I name them liars.

Well it wouldn’t be the first time.
1 year ago
#space #science 
How Many People Are In Space Right Now?→
1 year ago
#space #universe #science 
thedailywhat:

A Rare Total Solar Eclipse Takes Over the Night Skies in Australia

Photographed by former NASA photographer Ben Cooper in Queensland, Australia.
1 year ago
#NASA #solar eclipse #space #universe 
"If space-junk is the human debris that litters the universe Junk-Space is the residue mankind leaves on the planet… It replaces hierarchy with accumulation, composition with addition. More and more, more is more… Instead of development, it offers entropy… Traffic is Junkspace, from airspace to the subway; the entire highway system is Junkspace, a vast potential utopia clogged by its users… Fascism minus dictator… Junkspace will be our tomb. Half of mankind pollutes to produce, the other half pollutes to consume… Junkspace is political: It depends on the central removal of the critical faculty in the name of comfort and pleasure… Will Junkspace invade the body?"
2 years ago
#space #science 
The basis for all life.
Two extremely bright stars illuminate a greenish mist in this and other images from the new GLIMPSE360 survey. This fog is comprised of hydrogen and carbon compounds called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are found right here on Earth in sooty vehicle exhaust and on charred grills. In space, PAHs form in the dark clouds that give rise to stars. These molecules provide astronomers a way to visualize the peripheries of gas clouds and study their structures in great detail. PAHs are not actually “green;” a representative color coding in these images lets scientists observe PAHs glow in the infrared light that Spitzer sees, and which is invisible to us.
2 years ago
#universe #science #space 
theantidote:

Space Junk Problem Reaches Tipping Point
It’s bad news for all you aspiring space tourists out there. Soon, the only ticket into space may be of the suborbital variety and nothing more ambitious, like actually flying into orbit. Earth is now surrounded by so much space junk that a leading expert  on the issue has declared that we are at a “tipping point” — it may  soon become too dangerous to venture into low-Earth orbit (LEO) through  fear of having a manned spaceship punctured or a communications  satellite trashed.
[Read more]
Ian O’Neill on the nightmare scenario of the Space Age. Via: discoverynews
(via kateoplis:)
2 years ago
#science #space 
theantidote:


Cassiopeia A
Cassiopeia A is the remnant of a supernova explosion that occured over 300 years ago in our Galaxy, at a distance of about 11,000 light years from us. Its name is derived from the constellation in which it is seen: Cassiopeia, the Queen. A supernova is the explosion that occurs at the end of a massive star’s life; and Cassiopeia A is the expanding shell of material that remains from such an explosion. This radio image of Cassiopeia A was created with the National Science Foundation’s Very Large Array telescope in New Mexico. This image was made at 3 different frequencies: 1.4 GHz (L band), 5.0 GHz (C band), and 8.4 GHz (X band). Cassiopeia A is one of the brightest radio sources in the sky, and has been a popular target of study for radio astronomers for decades. The material that was ejected from the supernova explosion can be seen in this image as bright filaments.
Credit: NRAO/AUI

(via krestinaholodov:)
2 years ago
#space #universe #science 
"(Space programs are) a force operating on educational pipelines that stimulate the formation of scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians… They’re the ones that make tomorrow come. The foundations of economies… issue forth from investments we make in science and technology."
Neil deGrasse Tyson (via myheadisweak)

(Source: afro-dominicano, via myheadisweak)

2 years ago
#Science #Education #Technology #Space #Astronomy 
2 years ago
#astronomy #photography #science #space