shortformblog:

We suspect this will be less shocking to those of you already familiar with the violent crackdowns taking place in Bahrain, but most will likely find it discomforting nonetheless. Government officials from both the United States and Bahrain have insisted that the ordinance being sold by the Department of Defense couldn’t/wouldn’t be used against the Persian Gulf nation’s civilian population; however, some reports suggest that attacks with American weaponry have already occurred. source

shortformblog:

We suspect this will be less shocking to those of you already familiar with the violent crackdowns taking place in Bahrain, but most will likely find it discomforting nonetheless. Government officials from both the United States and Bahrain have insisted that the ordinance being sold by the Department of Defense couldn’t/wouldn’t be used against the Persian Gulf nation’s civilian population; however, some reports suggest that attacks with American weaponry have already occurred. source

(via other-stuff)

@1 year ago with 168 notes
#bahrain #arms trade #arab spring 

(via ixc3)

@1 year ago with 349 notes
#bahrain 
fotojournalismus:

Anti government protesters shout slogans as they try to enter al-Eker village, south of Manama, October 22, 2012. Seven people have been detained over the killing of a policeman last week in al-Eker, which police has blocked off since Friday. Wefaq, the main opposition group in Bahrain, said on Sunday that clashes had broken out near al-Eker, south of Manama, after some rights activists and medics tried to enter the village.
[Credit : Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters]

fotojournalismus:

Anti government protesters shout slogans as they try to enter al-Eker village, south of Manama, October 22, 2012. Seven people have been detained over the killing of a policeman last week in al-Eker, which police has blocked off since Friday. Wefaq, the main opposition group in Bahrain, said on Sunday that clashes had broken out near al-Eker, south of Manama, after some rights activists and medics tried to enter the village.

[Credit : Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters]

(via other-stuff)

@1 year ago with 157 notes
#bahrain #revolution #arab spring 
thepeoplesrecord:

Bahrain continues the revolution: Bahraini anti-government protesters run for cover from tear gas fired by riot police during a demonstration in the capital Manama on September 7, 2012.

thepeoplesrecord:

Bahrain continues the revolution: Bahraini anti-government protesters run for cover from tear gas fired by riot police during a demonstration in the capital Manama on September 7, 2012.

(via other-stuff)

@1 year ago with 72 notes
#bahrain #arab spring #revolution 
thepoliticalnotebook:

A photo of pro-democracy protests in Aali, Bahrain this morning. Read this article from The Huffington Post yesterday: “Bahrain Revolt: ”Before You Tell Us Everything, We’re Going To Have Some Fun.’”
[@AlWefaqEN]

thepoliticalnotebook:

A photo of pro-democracy protests in Aali, Bahrain this morning. Read this article from The Huffington Post yesterday: “Bahrain Revolt: ”Before You Tell Us Everything, We’re Going To Have Some Fun.’”

[@AlWefaqEN]

(via other-stuff)

@2 years ago with 64 notes
#bahrain #revolution 
nevver:

Bahrain
@2 years ago with 226 notes
#bahrain #photography 
worldwideriot:

from #bahrain with ♥

worldwideriot:

from #bahrain with ♥

(Source: worldwideriot, via fuckyeahanarchopunk)

@2 years ago with 2032 notes
#bahrain 
aljazeera:

Lengthy jail terms for Bahrain protesters | Thirty-six people given prison sentences of between 15 and 25 years for taking part in anti-government rallies.

aljazeera:

Lengthy jail terms for Bahrain protesters | Thirty-six people given prison sentences of between 15 and 25 years for taking part in anti-government rallies.

@2 years ago with 58 notes
#bahrain 
jayaprada:


Bahrain Posters: ‘Terrorism is an US Industry’


In the Shiite neighborhoods of Sitra in Bahrain, these posters are reportedly all over the place.
The picture on the bottom right-hand corner is John Timoney, the ex-US police chief whose expertise was tapped by the US-backed Bahraini dictatorship to crack down more efficiently on peaceful protesters.
The Obama administration, contrary to its own propaganda about being on the side of the people in the Arab Spring, has continued to lend economic, military, and diplomatic support to the tiny Persian Gulf monarch throughout its brutal repression of peaceful demonstrators since early 2011, when forty-seven unarmed protesters were shot and killed with live rounds by security forces.
The Bahraini regime hosts the US Navy’s Fifth Fleet, which allows the United States to “project power” in the Persian Gulf and patrol the Straits of Hormuz, through which 40 percent of the world’s seaborne oil passes. That ruthless geo-political advantage is not something the Obama administration is willing to give up for the sake of democracy and human rights.
Bahrain recently banned all protests and demonstration in a dramatic violation of basic rights. But it is only one aspect of the repressive, martial-law type responses from the US-supported dictatorship. Others have included systematic torture, beatings, weaponizing tear gas, imposing curfews, harassing well-known activists, show trials and detentions, and cracking down on press freedoms, among many others.

jayaprada:

Bahrain Posters: ‘Terrorism is an US Industry’

In the Shiite neighborhoods of Sitra in Bahrain, these posters are reportedly all over the place.

The picture on the bottom right-hand corner is John Timoney, the ex-US police chief whose expertise was tapped by the US-backed Bahraini dictatorship to crack down more efficiently on peaceful protesters.

The Obama administration, contrary to its own propaganda about being on the side of the people in the Arab Spring, has continued to lend economic, military, and diplomatic support to the tiny Persian Gulf monarch throughout its brutal repression of peaceful demonstrators since early 2011, when forty-seven unarmed protesters were shot and killed with live rounds by security forces.

The Bahraini regime hosts the US Navy’s Fifth Fleet, which allows the United States to “project power” in the Persian Gulf and patrol the Straits of Hormuz, through which 40 percent of the world’s seaborne oil passes. That ruthless geo-political advantage is not something the Obama administration is willing to give up for the sake of democracy and human rights.

Bahrain recently banned all protests and demonstration in a dramatic violation of basic rights. But it is only one aspect of the repressive, martial-law type responses from the US-supported dictatorship. Others have included systematic torturebeatingsweaponizing tear gas, imposing curfews, harassing well-known activists, show trials and detentions, and cracking down on press freedoms, among many others.

(via myheadisweak)

@1 year ago with 170 notes
#bahrain #barack obama 
thepeoplesrecord:

Bahrain government bans protests amid violenceOctober 30, 2012
Bahrain banned all protest gatherings on Tuesday and threatened legal action against groups said to be backing escalating demonstrations and clashes.
The interior ministry order is the most sweeping attempt to quash the anti-government uprising in the Sunni-ruled kingdom since martial law was imposed during the early months of unrest last year.
It sharply increases pressure on political groups from Bahrain’s Shia majority, which has led the protests in support of a greater political voice.
A crackdown on opposition groups could raise complications for Washington and other western allies that have stood by Bahrain’s monarchy during more than 20 months of unrest. The US has important military ties with Bahrain, which hosts the US navy’s 5th Fleet, but it also has called for increased dialogue to ease the tensions.
Shias make up around 70% of Bahrain’s 525,000 citizens, and claim they face systematic discrimination such as being denied top political and security posts. The Sunni monarchy has made a series of concessions – including giving more powers to the elected parliament – but opposition groups say the reforms do little to loosen the ruling family’s grip on power.
More than 50 people have been killed in Bahrain’s unrest since February 2011. Among them were two policemen who died this month from injuries suffered in attacks in which firebombs and explosives were used.
An interior ministry statement said Bahraini society was fed up with near nonstop demonstrations and clashes and that “there was a need to put an end to them”. Bahrain’s government has permitted limited protests and marches, but much of the violence occurs away from the authorised gatherings.
It added that any “illegal rally or gathering would be tackled through legal actions against those calling for and participating in it”.
The warning appeared aimed particularly at the largest Shia political bloc, al-Wefaq, which has organised many opposition marches. Another rally is planned for Friday.
An al-Wefaq official, Hadi al-Musawi, struck a defiant tone, saying the interior ministry order was against international human rights.
Other Gulf states have placed limits on political expression amid worries that movements inspired by last year’s Arab spring could threaten their ruling systems. Last week, Kuwait banned all public gatherings of more than 20 people following opposition protests ahead of parliamentary elections on 1 December.
Source

This is a regime that receives a supply of arms from western governments that pontificate about human rights on the international stage. 

thepeoplesrecord:

Bahrain government bans protests amid violence
October 30, 2012

Bahrain banned all protest gatherings on Tuesday and threatened legal action against groups said to be backing escalating demonstrations and clashes.

The interior ministry order is the most sweeping attempt to quash the anti-government uprising in the Sunni-ruled kingdom since martial law was imposed during the early months of unrest last year.

It sharply increases pressure on political groups from Bahrain’s Shia majority, which has led the protests in support of a greater political voice.

A crackdown on opposition groups could raise complications for Washington and other western allies that have stood by Bahrain’s monarchy during more than 20 months of unrest. The US has important military ties with Bahrain, which hosts the US navy’s 5th Fleet, but it also has called for increased dialogue to ease the tensions.

Shias make up around 70% of Bahrain’s 525,000 citizens, and claim they face systematic discrimination such as being denied top political and security posts. The Sunni monarchy has made a series of concessions – including giving more powers to the elected parliament – but opposition groups say the reforms do little to loosen the ruling family’s grip on power.

More than 50 people have been killed in Bahrain’s unrest since February 2011. Among them were two policemen who died this month from injuries suffered in attacks in which firebombs and explosives were used.

An interior ministry statement said Bahraini society was fed up with near nonstop demonstrations and clashes and that “there was a need to put an end to them”. Bahrain’s government has permitted limited protests and marches, but much of the violence occurs away from the authorised gatherings.

It added that any “illegal rally or gathering would be tackled through legal actions against those calling for and participating in it”.

The warning appeared aimed particularly at the largest Shia political bloc, al-Wefaq, which has organised many opposition marches. Another rally is planned for Friday.

An al-Wefaq official, Hadi al-Musawi, struck a defiant tone, saying the interior ministry order was against international human rights.

Other Gulf states have placed limits on political expression amid worries that movements inspired by last year’s Arab spring could threaten their ruling systems. Last week, Kuwait banned all public gatherings of more than 20 people following opposition protests ahead of parliamentary elections on 1 December.

Source

This is a regime that receives a supply of arms from western governments that pontificate about human rights on the international stage. 

(Source: thepeoplesrecord, via other-stuff)

@1 year ago with 78 notes
#bahrain #protest #revolution #arab spring 
@1 year ago with 65 notes
#bahrain #arab spring 
thepoliticalnotebook:

Picture of the Day: Sitra, Bahrain. Masked protesters wave the country’s flag amidst a cloud of tear gas.
Credit: EPA. Via.
View more Picture of the Day posts. Submit a photo

thepoliticalnotebook:

Picture of the Day: Sitra, Bahrain. Masked protesters wave the country’s flag amidst a cloud of tear gas.

Credit: EPA. Via.

View more Picture of the Day postsSubmit a photo

(via thepoliticalnotebook)

@2 years ago with 173 notes
#bahrain #revolution #arab spring #politics 
simply-war:

A man kisses his brother in the morgue of Bahrain’s Central hospital. The man was shot with a pellet gun by Bahraini police in February, 2011. Photography by; Andrea Bruce

simply-war:

A man kisses his brother in the morgue of Bahrain’s Central hospital. The man was shot with a pellet gun by Bahraini police in February, 2011. Photography by; Andrea Bruce

(via myheadisweak)

@2 years ago with 164 notes
#bahrain 

thepoliticalnotebook:

Pictures of the Day: Flames in Mid-Air EditionSalmabad and Bilad al-Qadeem, Bahrain. In the top photo, a protester throws a Molotov cocktail at security forces. In the second, a member of the riot police fires tear gas at protesters rallying in solidarity with imprisoned opposition members 

The must-read: A ProPublica piece by Justin Elliott, “Meet Bahrain’s Best Friend in Congress.” How did Democratic Representative Eni Faleomavaega of American Samoa become the Congressional champion of Bahrain and their crackdown on opposition? (Hint: there was a lobbying firm involved.

Photo Credit:  Hamad I Muhammad/Reuters (both photos). Via/Via.

View more Picture of the Day posts. Submit a photo.

(via lunarpolitics)

@2 years ago with 230 notes
#bahrain #revolution 
aljazeera:

Lengthy jail terms for Bahrain protesters | Thirty-six people given prison sentences of between 15 and 25 years for taking part in anti-government rallies.

aljazeera:

Lengthy jail terms for Bahrain protesters | Thirty-six people given prison sentences of between 15 and 25 years for taking part in anti-government rallies.

@2 years ago with 72 notes
#bahrain 
shortformblog:

We suspect this will be less shocking to those of you already familiar with the violent crackdowns taking place in Bahrain, but most will likely find it discomforting nonetheless. Government officials from both the United States and Bahrain have insisted that the ordinance being sold by the Department of Defense couldn’t/wouldn’t be used against the Persian Gulf nation’s civilian population; however, some reports suggest that attacks with American weaponry have already occurred. source
1 year ago
#bahrain #arms trade #arab spring 
jayaprada:


Bahrain Posters: ‘Terrorism is an US Industry’


In the Shiite neighborhoods of Sitra in Bahrain, these posters are reportedly all over the place.
The picture on the bottom right-hand corner is John Timoney, the ex-US police chief whose expertise was tapped by the US-backed Bahraini dictatorship to crack down more efficiently on peaceful protesters.
The Obama administration, contrary to its own propaganda about being on the side of the people in the Arab Spring, has continued to lend economic, military, and diplomatic support to the tiny Persian Gulf monarch throughout its brutal repression of peaceful demonstrators since early 2011, when forty-seven unarmed protesters were shot and killed with live rounds by security forces.
The Bahraini regime hosts the US Navy’s Fifth Fleet, which allows the United States to “project power” in the Persian Gulf and patrol the Straits of Hormuz, through which 40 percent of the world’s seaborne oil passes. That ruthless geo-political advantage is not something the Obama administration is willing to give up for the sake of democracy and human rights.
Bahrain recently banned all protests and demonstration in a dramatic violation of basic rights. But it is only one aspect of the repressive, martial-law type responses from the US-supported dictatorship. Others have included systematic torture, beatings, weaponizing tear gas, imposing curfews, harassing well-known activists, show trials and detentions, and cracking down on press freedoms, among many others.
1 year ago
#bahrain #barack obama 
1 year ago
#bahrain 
thepeoplesrecord:

Bahrain government bans protests amid violenceOctober 30, 2012
Bahrain banned all protest gatherings on Tuesday and threatened legal action against groups said to be backing escalating demonstrations and clashes.
The interior ministry order is the most sweeping attempt to quash the anti-government uprising in the Sunni-ruled kingdom since martial law was imposed during the early months of unrest last year.
It sharply increases pressure on political groups from Bahrain’s Shia majority, which has led the protests in support of a greater political voice.
A crackdown on opposition groups could raise complications for Washington and other western allies that have stood by Bahrain’s monarchy during more than 20 months of unrest. The US has important military ties with Bahrain, which hosts the US navy’s 5th Fleet, but it also has called for increased dialogue to ease the tensions.
Shias make up around 70% of Bahrain’s 525,000 citizens, and claim they face systematic discrimination such as being denied top political and security posts. The Sunni monarchy has made a series of concessions – including giving more powers to the elected parliament – but opposition groups say the reforms do little to loosen the ruling family’s grip on power.
More than 50 people have been killed in Bahrain’s unrest since February 2011. Among them were two policemen who died this month from injuries suffered in attacks in which firebombs and explosives were used.
An interior ministry statement said Bahraini society was fed up with near nonstop demonstrations and clashes and that “there was a need to put an end to them”. Bahrain’s government has permitted limited protests and marches, but much of the violence occurs away from the authorised gatherings.
It added that any “illegal rally or gathering would be tackled through legal actions against those calling for and participating in it”.
The warning appeared aimed particularly at the largest Shia political bloc, al-Wefaq, which has organised many opposition marches. Another rally is planned for Friday.
An al-Wefaq official, Hadi al-Musawi, struck a defiant tone, saying the interior ministry order was against international human rights.
Other Gulf states have placed limits on political expression amid worries that movements inspired by last year’s Arab spring could threaten their ruling systems. Last week, Kuwait banned all public gatherings of more than 20 people following opposition protests ahead of parliamentary elections on 1 December.
Source

This is a regime that receives a supply of arms from western governments that pontificate about human rights on the international stage. 
1 year ago
#bahrain #protest #revolution #arab spring 
fotojournalismus:

Anti government protesters shout slogans as they try to enter al-Eker village, south of Manama, October 22, 2012. Seven people have been detained over the killing of a policeman last week in al-Eker, which police has blocked off since Friday. Wefaq, the main opposition group in Bahrain, said on Sunday that clashes had broken out near al-Eker, south of Manama, after some rights activists and medics tried to enter the village.
[Credit : Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters]
1 year ago
#bahrain #revolution #arab spring 
1 year ago
#bahrain #arab spring 
thepeoplesrecord:

Bahrain continues the revolution: Bahraini anti-government protesters run for cover from tear gas fired by riot police during a demonstration in the capital Manama on September 7, 2012.
1 year ago
#bahrain #arab spring #revolution 
thepoliticalnotebook:

Picture of the Day: Sitra, Bahrain. Masked protesters wave the country’s flag amidst a cloud of tear gas.
Credit: EPA. Via.
View more Picture of the Day posts. Submit a photo
2 years ago
#bahrain #revolution #arab spring #politics 
thepoliticalnotebook:

A photo of pro-democracy protests in Aali, Bahrain this morning. Read this article from The Huffington Post yesterday: “Bahrain Revolt: ”Before You Tell Us Everything, We’re Going To Have Some Fun.’”
[@AlWefaqEN]
2 years ago
#bahrain #revolution 
simply-war:

A man kisses his brother in the morgue of Bahrain’s Central hospital. The man was shot with a pellet gun by Bahraini police in February, 2011. Photography by; Andrea Bruce
2 years ago
#bahrain 
nevver:

Bahrain
2 years ago
#bahrain #photography 
2 years ago
#bahrain #revolution 
worldwideriot:

from #bahrain with ♥
2 years ago
#bahrain 
aljazeera:

Lengthy jail terms for Bahrain protesters | Thirty-six people given prison sentences of between 15 and 25 years for taking part in anti-government rallies.
2 years ago
#bahrain 
aljazeera:

Lengthy jail terms for Bahrain protesters | Thirty-six people given prison sentences of between 15 and 25 years for taking part in anti-government rallies.
2 years ago
#bahrain