"My god, Romney actually said that America doesn’t install dictators, ignoring the fact that we’ve had these problems with Iran for 60 years precisely because we overthrew an elected president and installed a friendly dictator whose rule was so bloodthirsty that religious fanatics ran him out, imprisoned our embassy officials, and gave Ben Affleck a chance 30 years later to direct a cool movie."

Charles Pierce “Nothing Is Foreign to the Liar Willard Romney Anymore: A Report from the Flippy-Floppy Final Debate of 2012” http://www.esquire.com/blogs/politics/mitt-romney-foreign-policy-debate-14005209#ixzz2A6MaguJV (via x0)

This follows naturally when you cannot admit the US has ever done anything wrong.

(via other-stuff)

  • Mubarak
  • Ben Ali
  • Pinochet
  • Suharto
  • Botha
  • Franco
  • etc.

(via other-stuff)

@1 year ago with 337 notes
#politics #dictatorship #mitt romney #election 2012 
motherjones:

Another great Good slideshow: 7 African nations that could go Qaddafi and why.

motherjones:

Another great Good slideshow: 7 African nations that could go Qaddafi and why.

@3 years ago with 21 notes
#politics #revolution #dictatorship 

A Reminder: Mubarak Isn't the Only U.S.-Backed Dictator 

The United States’ relationship with Hosni Mubarak has been spotlighted recently as Egyptian protesters and American commentators question the Obama administration’s support of a president clearly opposed to the will of the people. Salon’s Justin Elliott has understandably decided this a good time to step back and take a look at some of the other repressive dictatorships supported by the American government. He offers a sample of some of America’s friends with the worst human rights records: Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Equitorial Guinea.

The Saudi Arabian government, for example, ignores the rights of its female and Shi’a citizens as well as its foreign workers. Human Rights Watch is seriously concerned with the Saudi government’s prohibition of free expression, movement and association “as well as a pervasive lack of accountability.” Still, the United States is planning to sell the Saudis “84 F-15 fighter aircraft and almost 200 helicopters, as well as trainers, simulators, generators, spare and repair parts, and other related elements of program support, according to CNN.”

Jordan, on the other hand, received $300 million in military aid from the United States just last year. Jordan is also on Human Rights Watch’s radar, where police torture is pervasive and free speech and government criticism are forbidden by law.

(Source: azspot)

@3 years ago with 75 notes
#politics #dictatorship #mubarak 
caraobrien:


From Dictatorship to Democracy: A Conceptual Framework for Liberation by Gene Sharp (pdf)
@3 years ago with 83 notes
#politics #dictatorship #democracy #revolution 
et-tu-dionysus:


My sister and I keep making jokes about this woman’s sign. SO PERFECT.

et-tu-dionysus:

My sister and I keep making jokes about this woman’s sign. SO PERFECT.

(via lipstick-feminists)

@3 years ago with 143 notes
#protest #politics #dictatorship #sexism 

"The hypocrisy of western liberals is breathtaking: they publicly supported democracy, and now, when the people revolt against the tyrants on behalf of secular freedom and justice, not on behalf of religion, they are all deeply concerned. Why concern, why not joy that freedom is given a chance? Today, more than ever, Mao Zedong’s old motto is pertinent: “There is great chaos under heaven – the situation is excellent.” Where, then, should Mubarak go? Here, the answer is also clear: to the Hague. If there is a leader who deserves to sit there, it is him."

@3 years ago with 84 notes
#politics #dictatorship #slavoj zizek 

Defining modern dictatorship and its overthrow 

In the December of 2001, the severe macroeconomic financial crisis in Argentina eventually forced President Fernando de la Rúa, who was implementing severe IMF-directed cuts to public spending and taxes rises onto the majority Argentines, out of office. The civil unrest surrounding the presidential palace was so severe, it required the president to unceremoniously leave his post via helicopter, in frightened exile of the nation’s wrath, disgust and revolt. The cause of the crisis itself essentially lay in the ethically dubious priorities of Argentina’s prior governments. Prior President Carlos Menem granted large tax cuts to corporations who lobbied in his favour, creating a massive budget shortfall and inflation. Like the current IMF-demanded technocracies implementing austerity’s social devastation and stratification in Southern Europe, the de la Rúa administration acted on the unelected auspecies of IMF dictact to implement the neoliberal preservation of corporate monopoly. Argentines themselves rejected this directly, with intellectual resentment.

The Egyptian revolution of 2011 is mostly covered and discussed in the media with a one-dimensional lack of context. The basic perception is that Egyptians found the bravery to take to the streets against the Mubarak dictatorship, and it was eventually overthrown with the support of western powers. But the conditions involved are much more awkwardly condemning and nuanced than this. As Noam Chomsky documents:  "Mubarak’s neoliberal programs since the early 80s have created wast wealth in small sectors and have engendered a huge corruption, severely harming a large majority of population. As inequality soared, all of this was, not surprisingly, accompanied by increasingly brutal repression of workers and others who sought elementary rights. But, virtually up to the moment of outburst of Arab spring, the World bank and IMF were issuing glowing reports on the remarkable achievement of such a system and Egypt’s economic and political managers.” 

We can judge that the majority of those involved in the anti-government protest movements in Egypt were generally unideological in their motives. They were mainly reacting in sociological rage and desperation to the injustice and despair imposed upon them for decades by Hosni Mubarak’s neoliberalism, and its privatizations, social stratification and suppression of the rights of workers. It received approval and support from many western corporations, governments and arms companies for these reasons, support of which was only withdrawn when the position of the Mubarak regime became entirely untenable on an accountably political, but not moral level.

(Source: jjarichardson.blogspot.com)

@2 years ago
#blog post #dictatorship #neoliberalism #egypt #mubarak #revolution #politics 

"

We are so used to seeing depictions of the most sensational aspects of totalitarian societies—the gulag, the death camps—that we don’t pay much attention to the fact that there is often an incremental process that led those societies to become places where such things could happen. The view that fascism looks from the start like a nationwide prison camp rather than a fairly normal society can be comforting when facing an argument like mine. It’s natural to wish that the two realities were so categorically different that, of course, “It couldn’t happen here.”



But as would-be dictators consolidate power, if they are training their sights on a democracy, things proceed fairly routinely in many areas in the earliest years. In the beginning, the horror, as W. H. Auden put it, is usually elsewhere, taking place while other people are going about their normal daily round. Peasants in Italy celebrated their harvest festivals in 1919 in Naples when Mussolini’s arditi were beating bloody the local communists in Milan. Journalist Joseph Roth, the star columnist for the Frankfurter Zeitung, filed glitzy reports on urban style and nightlife, on architecture and the avant-garde; he and his colleagues dwelt on the latest fashions and described the trendiest watering holes. As Roth rebutted rising anti-Semitism in print, Hitler was consolidating power around himself. Victor Klemperer, a Jewish professor of French literature who kept a diary throughout the rise and fall of the Third Reich, cared for his garden, did repairs on his car, chatted with his Nazi neighbors, went to the movies with his wife, even as he became increasingly aware of persecution, arrests, theft of property, and new discriminatory laws; even as he was certain of an inevitable catastrophe. That’s what people do.

"

Naomi Wolf, The End Of America [PDF]  (via cuntymint)

(via resmc)

@3 years ago with 30 notes
#naomi wolf #politics #revolution #dictatorship 
theweekmagazine:

America was a key backer of the Mubarak regime — at least, until the uprising in Cairo intensified this week. But Mubarak isn’t the only autocrat to receive U.S. backing. Here, a list of dictators the U.S. still supports: 
King Abdullah of Saudi ArabiaThe U.S. has had a  good relationship with Saudi Arabia since 1974, when Richard Nixon  became the first American president to visit the country. The ties  strengthened during George W. Bush’s tenure — Saudi Arabia was certified  as an anti-terrorism ally in 2007 — and King Abdullah maintains a good  relationship with President Obama. And yet Saudi Arabia is indisputably  an authoritarian regime. There is no elected parliament, public protests  are banned, and the media is controlled by the state. The United  States’ support of Abdullah may one day backfire, says  Alex Welch at The Daily Campus. “On the day the Saudi  monarchy collapses, the United States may find itself powerless to  defeat any anti-American sentiment that may foster as a result.” 
Sultan Qaboos bin  Said Al-Said of OmanThe Sultan of Oman has ruled  over the country in a benevolent dictatorship since 1970, and has  established an absolute monarchy under which all substantial decision  are made by him. Even so, Oman is one of  America’s oldest Arab allies, and one of the few Arab countries with  which a free trade agreement has been signed. Secretary of State  Hillary Clinton recently praised the “remarkable  gains” made in Oman under the Sultan’s leadership.
Read the full list of dictators we still support here. 
(Cartoon by Cam Cardow, copyright 2011 Cagle Cartoons)

theweekmagazine:

America was a key backer of the Mubarak regime — at least, until the uprising in Cairo intensified this week. But Mubarak isn’t the only autocrat to receive U.S. backing. Here, a list of dictators the U.S. still supports:

  • King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia
    The U.S. has had a good relationship with Saudi Arabia since 1974, when Richard Nixon became the first American president to visit the country. The ties strengthened during George W. Bush’s tenure — Saudi Arabia was certified as an anti-terrorism ally in 2007 — and King Abdullah maintains a good relationship with President Obama. And yet Saudi Arabia is indisputably an authoritarian regime. There is no elected parliament, public protests are banned, and the media is controlled by the state. The United States’ support of Abdullah may one day backfire, says Alex Welch at The Daily Campus. “On the day the Saudi monarchy collapses, the United States may find itself powerless to defeat any anti-American sentiment that may foster as a result.
  • Sultan Qaboos bin Said Al-Said of Oman
    The Sultan of Oman has ruled over the country in a benevolent dictatorship since 1970, and has established an absolute monarchy under which all substantial decision are made by him. Even so, Oman is one of America’s oldest Arab allies, and one of the few Arab countries with which a free trade agreement has been signed. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton recently praised the “remarkable gains” made in Oman under the Sultan’s leadership.

Read the full list of dictators we still support here.

(Cartoon by Cam Cardow, copyright 2011 Cagle Cartoons)

@3 years ago with 16 notes
#politics #dictatorship #revolution 

(Source: socialuprooting, via adamquinn)

@3 years ago with 88 notes
#politics #dictatorship #revolution 

The last bastion of dictatorship is the Internet router.  

The idea all revolves around wireless technology that will allow us to connect and communicate with each other without telephone lines, cable, or fiber. We will build private networks that can span countries. We will empower the citizens of tomorrow. At the end of the day a grandmother might find this disk on the street, walk into the house, install a CD on her laptop and join the mesh cloud with 2 clicks. After joining the mesh she starts to see others in her network, clicks to call others in the mesh, joins group calls, or searches for friends online to dial. We as the OpenMeshProject.org community will facilitate the building, offering, and support for this project. We will all build 1 common mesh. We invite people to participate and to offer new innovations. Working together we can secure tomorrows communications needs.

(Source: soupsoup)

@3 years ago with 59 notes
#technology #dictatorship #politics #censorship 
nationalpost:


They’re ‘our’ SOBs: U.S. has history of backing despots — when they’re useful
No one knows for sure if President Franklin D. Roosevelt really said, of the U.S.’s support for the corrupt Nicaraguan dictator, Anastasio Somoza Garcia, “He may be a son of a bitch, but he’s our son of a bitch.”Most likely he didn’t. It hardly matters. The fact the quote has, for 72 years, taken on a life of its own — it has been held up as the defining, cold-hearted mentality behind U.S. foreign policy — does.
More:
Peter Foster: Egypt, Harper, Obama and oil
Lawrence Solomon: Egypt’s reformer
Check out our full visual archive.

nationalpost:

They’re ‘our’ SOBs: U.S. has history of backing despots — when they’re useful

No one knows for sure if President Franklin D. Roosevelt really said, of the U.S.’s support for the corrupt Nicaraguan dictator, Anastasio Somoza Garcia, “He may be a son of a bitch, but he’s our son of a bitch.”

Most likely he didn’t. It hardly matters. The fact the quote has, for 72 years, taken on a life of its own — it has been held up as the defining, cold-hearted mentality behind U.S. foreign policy — does.

More:

Check out our full visual archive.

(via ilovecharts)

@3 years ago with 348 notes
#politics #dictatorship 
"My god, Romney actually said that America doesn’t install dictators, ignoring the fact that we’ve had these problems with Iran for 60 years precisely because we overthrew an elected president and installed a friendly dictator whose rule was so bloodthirsty that religious fanatics ran him out, imprisoned our embassy officials, and gave Ben Affleck a chance 30 years later to direct a cool movie."

Charles Pierce “Nothing Is Foreign to the Liar Willard Romney Anymore: A Report from the Flippy-Floppy Final Debate of 2012” http://www.esquire.com/blogs/politics/mitt-romney-foreign-policy-debate-14005209#ixzz2A6MaguJV (via x0)

This follows naturally when you cannot admit the US has ever done anything wrong.

(via other-stuff)

  • Mubarak
  • Ben Ali
  • Pinochet
  • Suharto
  • Botha
  • Franco
  • etc.

(via other-stuff)

1 year ago
#politics #dictatorship #mitt romney #election 2012 
Defining modern dictatorship and its overthrow→
In the December of 2001, the severe macroeconomic financial crisis in Argentina eventually forced President Fernando de la Rúa, who was implementing severe IMF-directed cuts to public spending and taxes rises onto the majority Argentines, out of office. The civil unrest surrounding the presidential palace was so severe, it required the president to unceremoniously leave his post via helicopter, in frightened exile of the nation’s wrath, disgust and revolt. The cause of the crisis itself essentially lay in the ethically dubious priorities of Argentina’s prior governments. Prior President Carlos Menem granted large tax cuts to corporations who lobbied in his favour, creating a massive budget shortfall and inflation. Like the current IMF-demanded technocracies implementing austerity’s social devastation and stratification in Southern Europe, the de la Rúa administration acted on the unelected auspecies of IMF dictact to implement the neoliberal preservation of corporate monopoly. Argentines themselves rejected this directly, with intellectual resentment.

The Egyptian revolution of 2011 is mostly covered and discussed in the media with a one-dimensional lack of context. The basic perception is that Egyptians found the bravery to take to the streets against the Mubarak dictatorship, and it was eventually overthrown with the support of western powers. But the conditions involved are much more awkwardly condemning and nuanced than this. As Noam Chomsky documents:  "Mubarak’s neoliberal programs since the early 80s have created wast wealth in small sectors and have engendered a huge corruption, severely harming a large majority of population. As inequality soared, all of this was, not surprisingly, accompanied by increasingly brutal repression of workers and others who sought elementary rights. But, virtually up to the moment of outburst of Arab spring, the World bank and IMF were issuing glowing reports on the remarkable achievement of such a system and Egypt’s economic and political managers.” 

We can judge that the majority of those involved in the anti-government protest movements in Egypt were generally unideological in their motives. They were mainly reacting in sociological rage and desperation to the injustice and despair imposed upon them for decades by Hosni Mubarak’s neoliberalism, and its privatizations, social stratification and suppression of the rights of workers. It received approval and support from many western corporations, governments and arms companies for these reasons, support of which was only withdrawn when the position of the Mubarak regime became entirely untenable on an accountably political, but not moral level.

(Source: jjarichardson.blogspot.com)

2 years ago
#blog post #dictatorship #neoliberalism #egypt #mubarak #revolution #politics 
motherjones:

Another great Good slideshow: 7 African nations that could go Qaddafi and why.
3 years ago
#politics #revolution #dictatorship 
"

We are so used to seeing depictions of the most sensational aspects of totalitarian societies—the gulag, the death camps—that we don’t pay much attention to the fact that there is often an incremental process that led those societies to become places where such things could happen. The view that fascism looks from the start like a nationwide prison camp rather than a fairly normal society can be comforting when facing an argument like mine. It’s natural to wish that the two realities were so categorically different that, of course, “It couldn’t happen here.”



But as would-be dictators consolidate power, if they are training their sights on a democracy, things proceed fairly routinely in many areas in the earliest years. In the beginning, the horror, as W. H. Auden put it, is usually elsewhere, taking place while other people are going about their normal daily round. Peasants in Italy celebrated their harvest festivals in 1919 in Naples when Mussolini’s arditi were beating bloody the local communists in Milan. Journalist Joseph Roth, the star columnist for the Frankfurter Zeitung, filed glitzy reports on urban style and nightlife, on architecture and the avant-garde; he and his colleagues dwelt on the latest fashions and described the trendiest watering holes. As Roth rebutted rising anti-Semitism in print, Hitler was consolidating power around himself. Victor Klemperer, a Jewish professor of French literature who kept a diary throughout the rise and fall of the Third Reich, cared for his garden, did repairs on his car, chatted with his Nazi neighbors, went to the movies with his wife, even as he became increasingly aware of persecution, arrests, theft of property, and new discriminatory laws; even as he was certain of an inevitable catastrophe. That’s what people do.

"
Naomi Wolf, The End Of America [PDF]  (via cuntymint)

(via resmc)

3 years ago
#naomi wolf #politics #revolution #dictatorship 
A Reminder: Mubarak Isn't the Only U.S.-Backed Dictator→

The United States’ relationship with Hosni Mubarak has been spotlighted recently as Egyptian protesters and American commentators question the Obama administration’s support of a president clearly opposed to the will of the people. Salon’s Justin Elliott has understandably decided this a good time to step back and take a look at some of the other repressive dictatorships supported by the American government. He offers a sample of some of America’s friends with the worst human rights records: Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Equitorial Guinea.

The Saudi Arabian government, for example, ignores the rights of its female and Shi’a citizens as well as its foreign workers. Human Rights Watch is seriously concerned with the Saudi government’s prohibition of free expression, movement and association “as well as a pervasive lack of accountability.” Still, the United States is planning to sell the Saudis “84 F-15 fighter aircraft and almost 200 helicopters, as well as trainers, simulators, generators, spare and repair parts, and other related elements of program support, according to CNN.”

Jordan, on the other hand, received $300 million in military aid from the United States just last year. Jordan is also on Human Rights Watch’s radar, where police torture is pervasive and free speech and government criticism are forbidden by law.

(Source: azspot)

3 years ago
#politics #dictatorship #mubarak 
theweekmagazine:

America was a key backer of the Mubarak regime — at least, until the uprising in Cairo intensified this week. But Mubarak isn’t the only autocrat to receive U.S. backing. Here, a list of dictators the U.S. still supports: 
King Abdullah of Saudi ArabiaThe U.S. has had a  good relationship with Saudi Arabia since 1974, when Richard Nixon  became the first American president to visit the country. The ties  strengthened during George W. Bush’s tenure — Saudi Arabia was certified  as an anti-terrorism ally in 2007 — and King Abdullah maintains a good  relationship with President Obama. And yet Saudi Arabia is indisputably  an authoritarian regime. There is no elected parliament, public protests  are banned, and the media is controlled by the state. The United  States’ support of Abdullah may one day backfire, says  Alex Welch at The Daily Campus. “On the day the Saudi  monarchy collapses, the United States may find itself powerless to  defeat any anti-American sentiment that may foster as a result.” 
Sultan Qaboos bin  Said Al-Said of OmanThe Sultan of Oman has ruled  over the country in a benevolent dictatorship since 1970, and has  established an absolute monarchy under which all substantial decision  are made by him. Even so, Oman is one of  America’s oldest Arab allies, and one of the few Arab countries with  which a free trade agreement has been signed. Secretary of State  Hillary Clinton recently praised the “remarkable  gains” made in Oman under the Sultan’s leadership.
Read the full list of dictators we still support here. 
(Cartoon by Cam Cardow, copyright 2011 Cagle Cartoons)
3 years ago
#politics #dictatorship #revolution 
caraobrien:


From Dictatorship to Democracy: A Conceptual Framework for Liberation by Gene Sharp (pdf)
3 years ago
#politics #dictatorship #democracy #revolution 
3 years ago
#politics #dictatorship #revolution 
et-tu-dionysus:


My sister and I keep making jokes about this woman’s sign. SO PERFECT.
3 years ago
#protest #politics #dictatorship #sexism 
The last bastion of dictatorship is the Internet router. →

The idea all revolves around wireless technology that will allow us to connect and communicate with each other without telephone lines, cable, or fiber. We will build private networks that can span countries. We will empower the citizens of tomorrow. At the end of the day a grandmother might find this disk on the street, walk into the house, install a CD on her laptop and join the mesh cloud with 2 clicks. After joining the mesh she starts to see others in her network, clicks to call others in the mesh, joins group calls, or searches for friends online to dial. We as the OpenMeshProject.org community will facilitate the building, offering, and support for this project. We will all build 1 common mesh. We invite people to participate and to offer new innovations. Working together we can secure tomorrows communications needs.

(Source: soupsoup)

3 years ago
#technology #dictatorship #politics #censorship 
"The hypocrisy of western liberals is breathtaking: they publicly supported democracy, and now, when the people revolt against the tyrants on behalf of secular freedom and justice, not on behalf of religion, they are all deeply concerned. Why concern, why not joy that freedom is given a chance? Today, more than ever, Mao Zedong’s old motto is pertinent: “There is great chaos under heaven – the situation is excellent.” Where, then, should Mubarak go? Here, the answer is also clear: to the Hague. If there is a leader who deserves to sit there, it is him."
3 years ago
#politics #dictatorship #slavoj zizek 
nationalpost:


They’re ‘our’ SOBs: U.S. has history of backing despots — when they’re useful
No one knows for sure if President Franklin D. Roosevelt really said, of the U.S.’s support for the corrupt Nicaraguan dictator, Anastasio Somoza Garcia, “He may be a son of a bitch, but he’s our son of a bitch.”Most likely he didn’t. It hardly matters. The fact the quote has, for 72 years, taken on a life of its own — it has been held up as the defining, cold-hearted mentality behind U.S. foreign policy — does.
More:
Peter Foster: Egypt, Harper, Obama and oil
Lawrence Solomon: Egypt’s reformer
Check out our full visual archive.
3 years ago
#politics #dictatorship