theolduvaigorge:

الثلوج في محيط أبوالهول بمنطقة الأهرامات بالجيزة لأول مرة منذ 122 عاما ، مشهد بديع

Snow in Egypt for the first time in 122 years.

(Source: @mar3e on Twitter)
@4 months ago with 6986 notes
#egypt #nature 

theatlantic:

In Focus: Egypt’s Unfinished Revolution: Two Years Later

Twenty-four months have passed since the start of the uprising that led to the overthrow of Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak. In that time, much has changed, but many of the most vocal revolutionaries are not yet satisfied. President Mohamed Morsi, who assumed office last summer, has frustrated the opposition within the new government. Morsi has sought to expand his powers by decree and has been accused of heavily favoring the wishes of his own political party, the Muslim Brotherhood, which is promoting a new Islamist constitution for Egypt. In the midst of all this, many of the same activists who set things in motion in 2011 took to the streets again this past weekend, feeling that their voices had been drowned out once again. At least 50 are now reported to have been killed in clashes between demonstrators and government (and pro-government) groups, and a state of emergency has been declared in three provinces. 

See more. [Images: AP, Reuters, Getty]

@1 year ago with 204 notes
#egypt #revolution 
thedailywhat:

Impending S**tstorm of the Day: Egyptians Protest President Mohamed Morsi’s Power Grab

As many as 200,000 Egyptians assembled in Cairo’s Tahrir Square and other major cities across the country to protest against Islamist President Mohamed Morsi’s self-issued edict that grants him sweeping powers, including what his critics say is immunity of his office and his Muslim Brotherhood-controlled assembly from judicial oversight. Since President Morsi’s declaration of the decree last Thursday, a 15-year-old member of the Muslim Brotherhood has been killed, more than 500 people injured and a dozen of his supporters’ offices ransacked or set ablaze.
Photo Credit: Jonathan Rashad via Flickr

thedailywhat:

Impending S**tstorm of the Day: Egyptians Protest President Mohamed Morsi’s Power Grab

As many as 200,000 Egyptians assembled in Cairo’s Tahrir Square and other major cities across the country to protest against Islamist President Mohamed Morsi’s self-issued edict that grants him sweeping powers, including what his critics say is immunity of his office and his Muslim Brotherhood-controlled assembly from judicial oversight. Since President Morsi’s declaration of the decree last Thursday, a 15-year-old member of the Muslim Brotherhood has been killed, more than 500 people injured and a dozen of his supporters’ offices ransacked or set ablaze.


Photo Credit: Jonathan Rashad via Flickr

@1 year ago with 640 notes
#egypt #politics #revolution 
vicemag:

VIGILANTES ARE TAGGING EGYPT’S SEXUAL HARASSERS WITH SPRAY PAINT

Despite worldwide publicity and campaigning, the approach to actually solving the sexual harassment epidemic in Egypt has sadly been a pretty apathetic one, with police giving less than a gram of shit about the situation, leaving street perverts to grope away until their hands are content. So it’s perhaps no surprise that anti-harassment groups in Cairo have gone vigilante, taking what’s left of the law into their own hands and patroling the streets to fight the harassment epidemic themselves. 
We first heard about “Be A Man,” one of the more radical anti-harassment campaigns, from a story on NPR. The members of the group patroled during the recent Eid al-Adha festival celebrations, armed with cans of black and white spray paint, attacking, pinning down, and scarlet-lettering the shit out of grabbers and gropers with the words “I Am a Harasser.” Mostly men themselves, the activists wore matching fluoro jackets with “Harassment Prevention” scrawled across their backs in Arabic. I spoke to Muhammad Taimoor, leader and founder of the campaign, about their controversial tactics during the festival.
VICE: Hey Muhammad. Can you tell me a little bit about what’s been going on in the past few weeks?Muhammad Taimoor: Yeah, we’ve been working against harassment with our campaign, “Be a Man.” A big problem here is that women-only carriages on the subway are being invaded by men who are then harassing the women onboard, so we’ve been working against that. It was Eid a couple of weeks ago and we were expecting that would be a particularly bad time for harassment. In the three days of Eid that I participated in, we caught about 300 cases of harassment—that’s 100 every day.   
Wow, good job. How do you “catch” these cases?Our tactics this time were pretty violent—a lot of people were offended because they didn’t like what we were doing. Basically, we attacked the harassers and spray-painted “I Am a Harasser” on anyone we caught in the act. The police weren’t at all supportive of what we were trying to do and they clearly weren’t ready to keep Egyptian women safe during Eid, so we did all the work on our own. 
Why did you choose tagging with spray-paint as a tactic?Because, in our society, a girl blames herself when she gets harassed. When she speaks out to her family about it, they blame her. Sometimes they prevent her from going to school or going outside because they think that sexual harassment is the girl’s problem, not the harasser’s problem. So, when our group attacks the harasser, the girl feels confident in herself. She feels like she was right, she feels like the street is supporting her. She’ll have the confidence to walk in the street without fear and she won’t be afraid to speak out if it happens again.

Keep Reading

vicemag:

VIGILANTES ARE TAGGING EGYPT’S SEXUAL HARASSERS WITH SPRAY PAINT

Despite worldwide publicity and campaigning, the approach to actually solving the sexual harassment epidemic in Egypt has sadly been a pretty apathetic one, with police giving less than a gram of shit about the situation, leaving street perverts to grope away until their hands are content. So it’s perhaps no surprise that anti-harassment groups in Cairo have gone vigilante, taking what’s left of the law into their own hands and patroling the streets to fight the harassment epidemic themselves. 

We first heard about “Be A Man,” one of the more radical anti-harassment campaigns, from a story on NPR. The members of the group patroled during the recent Eid al-Adha festival celebrations, armed with cans of black and white spray paint, attacking, pinning down, and scarlet-lettering the shit out of grabbers and gropers with the words “I Am a Harasser.” Mostly men themselves, the activists wore matching fluoro jackets with “Harassment Prevention” scrawled across their backs in Arabic. I spoke to Muhammad Taimoor, leader and founder of the campaign, about their controversial tactics during the festival.

VICEHey Muhammad. Can you tell me a little bit about what’s been going on in the past few weeks?
Muhammad Taimoor: Yeah, we’ve been working against harassment with our campaign, “Be a Man.” A big problem here is that women-only carriages on the subway are being invaded by men who are then harassing the women onboard, so we’ve been working against that. It was Eid a couple of weeks ago and we were expecting that would be a particularly bad time for harassment. In the three days of Eid that I participated in, we caught about 300 cases of harassment—that’s 100 every day.   

Wow, good job. How do you “catch” these cases?
Our tactics this time were pretty violent—a lot of people were offended because they didn’t like what we were doing. Basically, we attacked the harassers and spray-painted “I Am a Harasser” on anyone we caught in the act. The police weren’t at all supportive of what we were trying to do and they clearly weren’t ready to keep Egyptian women safe during Eid, so we did all the work on our own. 

Why did you choose tagging with spray-paint as a tactic?
Because, in our society, a girl blames herself when she gets harassed. When she speaks out to her family about it, they blame her. Sometimes they prevent her from going to school or going outside because they think that sexual harassment is the girl’s problem, not the harasser’s problem. So, when our group attacks the harasser, the girl feels confident in herself. She feels like she was right, she feels like the street is supporting her. She’ll have the confidence to walk in the street without fear and she won’t be afraid to speak out if it happens again.

Keep Reading

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

@1 year ago with 18793 notes
#egypt 
nathoyt:

kiltcladjakeenglish:

indygogo:

tom-aiac:

thesongwhispers:

peskytimepirate:

 world-realities:

‘Christian or Muslim, We Are All Egyptians’ - Christians form a human chain around Muslims to protect them from disruptions during Friday prayer in Alexandria, Egypt.


Jesus told us to love people. It’s what we do.

 Now THIS is what faith is really all about! That’s beautiful.
you see mom, christians aren’t so bad 

It’s sad that this is one of the first things I’ve seen that don’t totally put us in bad light just because we believe what we believe.
Thanks, Tumblr. .u.

Muslims did the same thing outside churches in their neighborhoods when Christians were worried about being attacked during their Christmas services.
This is goddamn beautiful.

nathoyt:

kiltcladjakeenglish:

indygogo:

tom-aiac:

thesongwhispers:

peskytimepirate:

 world-realities:

‘Christian or Muslim, We Are All Egyptians’ - Christians form a human chain around Muslims to protect them from disruptions during Friday prayer in Alexandria, Egypt.

Jesus told us to love people. It’s what we do.


Now THIS is what faith is really all about! That’s beautiful.

you see mom, christians aren’t so bad 

It’s sad that this is one of the first things I’ve seen that don’t totally put us in bad light just because we believe what we believe.

Thanks, Tumblr. .u.

Muslims did the same thing outside churches in their neighborhoods when Christians were worried about being attacked during their Christmas services.

This is goddamn beautiful.

(via onomatopoeinis)

@1 year ago with 51529 notes
#egypt #revolution #religion #arab spring 
thepoliticalnotebook:

On Sunday, Fatma Nabil became the first female news presenter to appear on Egyptian state television wearing a head scarf. Under Mubarak’s rule women could not take on-camera jobs while wearing Muslim head garb, and despite the fact that many sued and even won, the rulings were ignored. (Don’t read this as any implicit support on my behalf for President Morsi, Egypt’s Islamists or even for Egyptian state television… what I do very much support is the fact that women who wish to wear the headscarf while in pursuit of their own career are free to do so.)
Screen grab of state TV via MSNBC.

thepoliticalnotebook:

On Sunday, Fatma Nabil became the first female news presenter to appear on Egyptian state television wearing a head scarf. Under Mubarak’s rule women could not take on-camera jobs while wearing Muslim head garb, and despite the fact that many sued and even won, the rulings were ignored. (Don’t read this as any implicit support on my behalf for President Morsi, Egypt’s Islamists or even for Egyptian state television… what I do very much support is the fact that women who wish to wear the headscarf while in pursuit of their own career are free to do so.)

Screen grab of state TV via MSNBC.

(Source: nbcnews.com, via thepoliticalnotebook)

@1 year ago with 981 notes
#egypt 
reuters:

Islamist Mohamed Morsy of the Muslim Brotherhood was declared Egypt’s first democratic president on Sunday by the state election committee, which said he had defeated former general Ahmed Shafik with 51.7 percent of last weekend’s run-off vote.
He succeeds Hosni Mubarak, who was overthrown 16 months ago after a popular uprising. The military council which has ruled the biggest Arab nation since then has this month curbed the powers of the presidency, meaning the head of state will have to work closely with the army on a planned democratic constitution.
READ MORE: Islamist Morsy wins Egyptian presidency with 52 percent

Morsey is ideologically different to many revolutionaries, but nevertheless a figure that they can call coalesce around against the SCAF junta.

reuters:

Islamist Mohamed Morsy of the Muslim Brotherhood was declared Egypt’s first democratic president on Sunday by the state election committee, which said he had defeated former general Ahmed Shafik with 51.7 percent of last weekend’s run-off vote.

He succeeds Hosni Mubarak, who was overthrown 16 months ago after a popular uprising. The military council which has ruled the biggest Arab nation since then has this month curbed the powers of the presidency, meaning the head of state will have to work closely with the army on a planned democratic constitution.

READ MORE: Islamist Morsy wins Egyptian presidency with 52 percent

Morsey is ideologically different to many revolutionaries, but nevertheless a figure that they can call coalesce around against the SCAF junta.

(via soupsoup)

@1 year ago with 79 notes
#egypt #revolution #politics #mohamed morsi 

Defining modern dictatorship and its overthrow 

In the December of 2001, the severe macroeconomic financial crisis in Argentina eventually forced President Fernando de la Rúa, who was implementing severe IMF-directed cuts to public spending and taxes rises onto the majority Argentines, out of office. The civil unrest surrounding the presidential palace was so severe, it required the president to unceremoniously leave his post via helicopter, in frightened exile of the nation’s wrath, disgust and revolt. The cause of the crisis itself essentially lay in the ethically dubious priorities of Argentina’s prior governments. Prior President Carlos Menem granted large tax cuts to corporations who lobbied in his favour, creating a massive budget shortfall and inflation. Like the current IMF-demanded technocracies implementing austerity’s social devastation and stratification in Southern Europe, the de la Rúa administration acted on the unelected auspecies of IMF dictact to implement the neoliberal preservation of corporate monopoly. Argentines themselves rejected this directly, with intellectual resentment.

The Egyptian revolution of 2011 is mostly covered and discussed in the media with a one-dimensional lack of context. The basic perception is that Egyptians found the bravery to take to the streets against the Mubarak dictatorship, and it was eventually overthrown with the support of western powers. But the conditions involved are much more awkwardly condemning and nuanced than this. As Noam Chomsky documents:  "Mubarak’s neoliberal programs since the early 80s have created wast wealth in small sectors and have engendered a huge corruption, severely harming a large majority of population. As inequality soared, all of this was, not surprisingly, accompanied by increasingly brutal repression of workers and others who sought elementary rights. But, virtually up to the moment of outburst of Arab spring, the World bank and IMF were issuing glowing reports on the remarkable achievement of such a system and Egypt’s economic and political managers.” 

We can judge that the majority of those involved in the anti-government protest movements in Egypt were generally unideological in their motives. They were mainly reacting in sociological rage and desperation to the injustice and despair imposed upon them for decades by Hosni Mubarak’s neoliberalism, and its privatizations, social stratification and suppression of the rights of workers. It received approval and support from many western corporations, governments and arms companies for these reasons, support of which was only withdrawn when the position of the Mubarak regime became entirely untenable on an accountably political, but not moral level.

(Source: jjarichardson.blogspot.com)

@2 years ago
#blog post #dictatorship #neoliberalism #egypt #mubarak #revolution #politics 
thegoddamazon:

asleepnomore:

People from Egypt protests have a message for the US

The fact that they divorced the politicians from the people warmed my heart.
Love this.

thegoddamazon:

asleepnomore:

People from Egypt protests have a message for the US

The fact that they divorced the politicians from the people warmed my heart.

Love this.

(via anarcho-queer)

@9 months ago with 56729 notes
#egypt #revolution 

"I really consider President and Mrs. Mubarak to be friends of my family."

Hillary Clinton, 2009

(Source: abcnews.go.com)

@1 year ago
#hillary clinton #hosni mubarak #egypt #human rights #politics 
thepeoplesrecord:

This is Tahrir Square in Cairo right now: occupied, lively & packed with protesters. 
Anti-Morsi demonstrators filled the Square last night after a decree issued on Thursday expanded his powers and shielded his decisions from any sort of judicial review until the election of a new parliament expected in the first half of 2013.
“We don’t want a dictatorship again. The Mubarak regime was a dictatorship. We had a revolution to have justice and freedom,” 32-year-old Ahmed Husseini said in Cairo.
Click here to watch a livestream of Tahrir.

The western world has a lot to learn from Egyptians.

thepeoplesrecord:

This is Tahrir Square in Cairo right now: occupied, lively & packed with protesters. 

Anti-Morsi demonstrators filled the Square last night after a decree issued on Thursday expanded his powers and shielded his decisions from any sort of judicial review until the election of a new parliament expected in the first half of 2013.

“We don’t want a dictatorship again. The Mubarak regime was a dictatorship. We had a revolution to have justice and freedom,” 32-year-old Ahmed Husseini said in Cairo.

Click here to watch a livestream of Tahrir.

The western world has a lot to learn from Egyptians.

@1 year ago with 8598 notes
#egypt #revolution 
this-flesh:

A protester carries away a tear gas cannister during clashes with Egyptian riot policemen near Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt. November 2011.

this-flesh:

A protester carries away a tear gas cannister during clashes with Egyptian riot policemen near Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt. November 2011.

(via myheadisweak)

@1 year ago with 65 notes
#egypt #revolution 

headlinehelper:

Revolutionary street art in downtown Cairo.

(via myheadisweak)

@1 year ago with 192 notes
#egypt #revolution #arab spring #art 

"You could stop your politicians selling arms to the people who are shooting us."

Egyptian activist Salma Said’s answer when she was asked what people in the West could do to help with the Arab Revolution. “Said spoke from experience: she was hospitalised after being shot during protests that followed the Port Said football stadium tragedy that left at least 74 people dead.”

The fact that women’s rights have been hijacked for the purposes of liberal interventionists should be a concern to women in the West. We should therefore tread carefully when supporting politicians who make pronouncements about democracy and human rights, ensuring that we always read the small print. In this respect, the arms trade is a feminist issue.

Read this.

(via mehreenkasana)

With the U.S. government apologize for providing the Mubarak regime with billions of the dollars worth of military aid for decades?

(via ceborgia)

@1 year ago with 994 notes
#egypt #revolution #arms trade 
flyingfatkidd:

politics-war:

politics-war:
Tahrir Square, Cairo - Christians protecting Muslims at prayer during an Occupation.

Beautiful.This is legit beautiful.

flyingfatkidd:

politics-war:

politics-war:

Tahrir Square, Cairo - Christians protecting Muslims at prayer during an Occupation.

Beautiful.
This is legit beautiful.

(via tomjoadsghost)

@1 year ago with 1472 notes
#egypt #revolution #tahrir #religion #submission 
theolduvaigorge:

الثلوج في محيط أبوالهول بمنطقة الأهرامات بالجيزة لأول مرة منذ 122 عاما ، مشهد بديع

Snow in Egypt for the first time in 122 years.

(Source: @mar3e on Twitter)
4 months ago
#egypt #nature 
thegoddamazon:

asleepnomore:

People from Egypt protests have a message for the US

The fact that they divorced the politicians from the people warmed my heart.
Love this.
9 months ago
#egypt #revolution 
1 year ago
#egypt #revolution 
"I really consider President and Mrs. Mubarak to be friends of my family."
Hillary Clinton, 2009

(Source: abcnews.go.com)

1 year ago
#hillary clinton #hosni mubarak #egypt #human rights #politics 
thedailywhat:

Impending S**tstorm of the Day: Egyptians Protest President Mohamed Morsi’s Power Grab

As many as 200,000 Egyptians assembled in Cairo’s Tahrir Square and other major cities across the country to protest against Islamist President Mohamed Morsi’s self-issued edict that grants him sweeping powers, including what his critics say is immunity of his office and his Muslim Brotherhood-controlled assembly from judicial oversight. Since President Morsi’s declaration of the decree last Thursday, a 15-year-old member of the Muslim Brotherhood has been killed, more than 500 people injured and a dozen of his supporters’ offices ransacked or set ablaze.
Photo Credit: Jonathan Rashad via Flickr
1 year ago
#egypt #politics #revolution 
thepeoplesrecord:

This is Tahrir Square in Cairo right now: occupied, lively & packed with protesters. 
Anti-Morsi demonstrators filled the Square last night after a decree issued on Thursday expanded his powers and shielded his decisions from any sort of judicial review until the election of a new parliament expected in the first half of 2013.
“We don’t want a dictatorship again. The Mubarak regime was a dictatorship. We had a revolution to have justice and freedom,” 32-year-old Ahmed Husseini said in Cairo.
Click here to watch a livestream of Tahrir.

The western world has a lot to learn from Egyptians.
1 year ago
#egypt #revolution 
vicemag:

VIGILANTES ARE TAGGING EGYPT’S SEXUAL HARASSERS WITH SPRAY PAINT

Despite worldwide publicity and campaigning, the approach to actually solving the sexual harassment epidemic in Egypt has sadly been a pretty apathetic one, with police giving less than a gram of shit about the situation, leaving street perverts to grope away until their hands are content. So it’s perhaps no surprise that anti-harassment groups in Cairo have gone vigilante, taking what’s left of the law into their own hands and patroling the streets to fight the harassment epidemic themselves. 
We first heard about “Be A Man,” one of the more radical anti-harassment campaigns, from a story on NPR. The members of the group patroled during the recent Eid al-Adha festival celebrations, armed with cans of black and white spray paint, attacking, pinning down, and scarlet-lettering the shit out of grabbers and gropers with the words “I Am a Harasser.” Mostly men themselves, the activists wore matching fluoro jackets with “Harassment Prevention” scrawled across their backs in Arabic. I spoke to Muhammad Taimoor, leader and founder of the campaign, about their controversial tactics during the festival.
VICE: Hey Muhammad. Can you tell me a little bit about what’s been going on in the past few weeks?Muhammad Taimoor: Yeah, we’ve been working against harassment with our campaign, “Be a Man.” A big problem here is that women-only carriages on the subway are being invaded by men who are then harassing the women onboard, so we’ve been working against that. It was Eid a couple of weeks ago and we were expecting that would be a particularly bad time for harassment. In the three days of Eid that I participated in, we caught about 300 cases of harassment—that’s 100 every day.   
Wow, good job. How do you “catch” these cases?Our tactics this time were pretty violent—a lot of people were offended because they didn’t like what we were doing. Basically, we attacked the harassers and spray-painted “I Am a Harasser” on anyone we caught in the act. The police weren’t at all supportive of what we were trying to do and they clearly weren’t ready to keep Egyptian women safe during Eid, so we did all the work on our own. 
Why did you choose tagging with spray-paint as a tactic?Because, in our society, a girl blames herself when she gets harassed. When she speaks out to her family about it, they blame her. Sometimes they prevent her from going to school or going outside because they think that sexual harassment is the girl’s problem, not the harasser’s problem. So, when our group attacks the harasser, the girl feels confident in herself. She feels like she was right, she feels like the street is supporting her. She’ll have the confidence to walk in the street without fear and she won’t be afraid to speak out if it happens again.

Keep Reading
1 year ago
#egypt 
this-flesh:

A protester carries away a tear gas cannister during clashes with Egyptian riot policemen near Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt. November 2011.
1 year ago
#egypt #revolution 
nathoyt:

kiltcladjakeenglish:

indygogo:

tom-aiac:

thesongwhispers:

peskytimepirate:

 world-realities:

‘Christian or Muslim, We Are All Egyptians’ - Christians form a human chain around Muslims to protect them from disruptions during Friday prayer in Alexandria, Egypt.


Jesus told us to love people. It’s what we do.

 Now THIS is what faith is really all about! That’s beautiful.
you see mom, christians aren’t so bad 

It’s sad that this is one of the first things I’ve seen that don’t totally put us in bad light just because we believe what we believe.
Thanks, Tumblr. .u.

Muslims did the same thing outside churches in their neighborhoods when Christians were worried about being attacked during their Christmas services.
This is goddamn beautiful.
1 year ago
#egypt #revolution #religion #arab spring 
1 year ago
#egypt #revolution #arab spring #art 
thepoliticalnotebook:

On Sunday, Fatma Nabil became the first female news presenter to appear on Egyptian state television wearing a head scarf. Under Mubarak’s rule women could not take on-camera jobs while wearing Muslim head garb, and despite the fact that many sued and even won, the rulings were ignored. (Don’t read this as any implicit support on my behalf for President Morsi, Egypt’s Islamists or even for Egyptian state television… what I do very much support is the fact that women who wish to wear the headscarf while in pursuit of their own career are free to do so.)
Screen grab of state TV via MSNBC.
1 year ago
#egypt 
"You could stop your politicians selling arms to the people who are shooting us."

Egyptian activist Salma Said’s answer when she was asked what people in the West could do to help with the Arab Revolution. “Said spoke from experience: she was hospitalised after being shot during protests that followed the Port Said football stadium tragedy that left at least 74 people dead.”

The fact that women’s rights have been hijacked for the purposes of liberal interventionists should be a concern to women in the West. We should therefore tread carefully when supporting politicians who make pronouncements about democracy and human rights, ensuring that we always read the small print. In this respect, the arms trade is a feminist issue.

Read this.

(via mehreenkasana)

With the U.S. government apologize for providing the Mubarak regime with billions of the dollars worth of military aid for decades?

(via ceborgia)

1 year ago
#egypt #revolution #arms trade 
reuters:

Islamist Mohamed Morsy of the Muslim Brotherhood was declared Egypt’s first democratic president on Sunday by the state election committee, which said he had defeated former general Ahmed Shafik with 51.7 percent of last weekend’s run-off vote.
He succeeds Hosni Mubarak, who was overthrown 16 months ago after a popular uprising. The military council which has ruled the biggest Arab nation since then has this month curbed the powers of the presidency, meaning the head of state will have to work closely with the army on a planned democratic constitution.
READ MORE: Islamist Morsy wins Egyptian presidency with 52 percent

Morsey is ideologically different to many revolutionaries, but nevertheless a figure that they can call coalesce around against the SCAF junta.
1 year ago
#egypt #revolution #politics #mohamed morsi 
flyingfatkidd:

politics-war:

politics-war:
Tahrir Square, Cairo - Christians protecting Muslims at prayer during an Occupation.

Beautiful.This is legit beautiful.
1 year ago
#egypt #revolution #tahrir #religion #submission 
Defining modern dictatorship and its overthrow→
In the December of 2001, the severe macroeconomic financial crisis in Argentina eventually forced President Fernando de la Rúa, who was implementing severe IMF-directed cuts to public spending and taxes rises onto the majority Argentines, out of office. The civil unrest surrounding the presidential palace was so severe, it required the president to unceremoniously leave his post via helicopter, in frightened exile of the nation’s wrath, disgust and revolt. The cause of the crisis itself essentially lay in the ethically dubious priorities of Argentina’s prior governments. Prior President Carlos Menem granted large tax cuts to corporations who lobbied in his favour, creating a massive budget shortfall and inflation. Like the current IMF-demanded technocracies implementing austerity’s social devastation and stratification in Southern Europe, the de la Rúa administration acted on the unelected auspecies of IMF dictact to implement the neoliberal preservation of corporate monopoly. Argentines themselves rejected this directly, with intellectual resentment.

The Egyptian revolution of 2011 is mostly covered and discussed in the media with a one-dimensional lack of context. The basic perception is that Egyptians found the bravery to take to the streets against the Mubarak dictatorship, and it was eventually overthrown with the support of western powers. But the conditions involved are much more awkwardly condemning and nuanced than this. As Noam Chomsky documents:  "Mubarak’s neoliberal programs since the early 80s have created wast wealth in small sectors and have engendered a huge corruption, severely harming a large majority of population. As inequality soared, all of this was, not surprisingly, accompanied by increasingly brutal repression of workers and others who sought elementary rights. But, virtually up to the moment of outburst of Arab spring, the World bank and IMF were issuing glowing reports on the remarkable achievement of such a system and Egypt’s economic and political managers.” 

We can judge that the majority of those involved in the anti-government protest movements in Egypt were generally unideological in their motives. They were mainly reacting in sociological rage and desperation to the injustice and despair imposed upon them for decades by Hosni Mubarak’s neoliberalism, and its privatizations, social stratification and suppression of the rights of workers. It received approval and support from many western corporations, governments and arms companies for these reasons, support of which was only withdrawn when the position of the Mubarak regime became entirely untenable on an accountably political, but not moral level.

(Source: jjarichardson.blogspot.com)

2 years ago
#blog post #dictatorship #neoliberalism #egypt #mubarak #revolution #politics