The 39 Worst Words, Phrases, and Parts of Speech of 2013 

nevver:

  • ”#.” R.I.P., early Twitter feature. We’ll bury you next to your friend, the FourSquare check-in.
  • adverbs. Ban all adverbs. They’re mostly just gulp words, really.
  • "all the things."
  • "because [noun]": (i.e. “because science.”)
  • brogurt.” No.
  • classy.
  • "controversial tweet." There’s just no way to make this sound dignified, and besides, it leads to think pieces.
  • "cronut."
  • "crowdsourced."
  • "derp." It’s been an emotional ride, but it’s time to send this one off on the ice floe.
  • "disrupt." Luxury car apps aren’t disruptive.
  • "Donald Trump is considering a run for…" No, he’s not. He just isn’t. And if you’d like to get him unearned publicity, you should at least get some stock options out of it.
  • "doubled down." Unless the candidate did it while biting into a delicious sandwich, let’s just say the candidate “reaffirmed his/her position” on transportation funding or burrito drones or whatever we’ll be discussing in 2014.
  • "…favorited a tweet you were mentioned in." No one has ever wanted to know this.
  • "gaffe.” It’s going to be a long-enough election year as it is.
  • "game-changer." What you’re describing probably won’t change the game. But if it does, would you want to spoil the moment with a cliche?
  • "Guy Fieri." What if we all decided to just never mention him again? Would he disappear?
  • "hashtag." This refers to the spoken utterance of the word “hashtag,” often accompanied by air-quotes. People can see you doing this.
  • "hipster. Wearing glasses is not something people do because they’re hipsters; it’s something people do because they’re nearsighted. People don’t drink hot chocolate because it’s a hipster thing to do; they drink hot chocolate because it’s literally liquid chocolate. Yes, I wrote “literally.” That’s what happens when you use a word so casually and carelessly in think pieces as to render it meaningless.
  • "I can’t even." You can. Dig deep. Find your Kentucky.
  • "impact." (When used as a verb.)
  • "…in .gifs."
  • "…in one chart." We’re aiming high in 2014. Two chart minimum!
  • "listicle." This is the last one.
  • "literally the worst." Actually, while we’re at it, let’s ban "literally." Literally is the "not the Onion" of fake things.
  • "millennial." Young people are living with their parents because their parents’ generation destroyed the global economy. Next.
  • "nondescript office park." As opposed to the Frank Gehry ones.
  • "not the Onion.
  • "Rethuglicans, Repugs," "Republikkkans," "Demoncrats," "Dumbocrats," and every other variation thereof. Please just use the normal proper nouns; you can add whatever modifier you like before or after.
  • "selfie." But what do they tell us about our society, in the digital now? Let’s ask James Franco.
  • "Snowfall." (In the future, a high-cost digital production that doesn’t live up to the hype shall be known as a "Skyfall.")
  • "the Internets." This was a George W. Bush joke or something, right? You can still use the Internet—just drop the “s.”
  • "This Town."
  • "thought leader." Mostly beaten out of existence, but don’t think we didn’t notice that Paul Allen interview, Wired. You’re on notice.
  • #YOLO. Seriously.

@3 months ago with 1357 notes
#language 

Free language eBooks 

tyadorborlu:

thelanguagecommunity:

A library of eBooks for Vietnamese, Cantonese, Malay-Indonesian, Finnish, Estonian, Georgian, Amharic, Ethiopian, Arabic, Turkish, Persian, Greek, Welsh, Gaelic, German, Polish, Russian, Romanian, Spanish, Catalan, Basque and French and more.

THIS IS SO BRILLIANT

(via gresa)

@4 months ago with 531 notes
#language #education 

"Sanskrit has ninety-six words for love; ancient Persian has eighty, Greek three, and English only one. This is indicative of the poverty of awareness or emphasis that we give to that tremendously important realm of feeling. Eskimos have thirty words for snow, because it is a life-and death matter to them to have exact information about the element they live with so intimately. If we had a vocabulary of thirty words for love … we would immediately be richer and more intelligent in this human element so close to our heart. An Eskimo probably would die of clumsiness if he had only one word for snow; we are close to dying of loneliness because we have only one word for love. Of all the Western languages, English may be the most lacking when it come to feeling."

Robert Johnson, Fisher King

I love you in America is drenched with the smell of sex or the wisps of longing for another person echoing it back to you. 

I’ve chocked back so many I love you’s from fear of misinterpretation from friends, crushes, supervisors. 

Sometimes I love delicately, sometimes I love violently, but always I love, am full of love.

(via dishabillic)

(via thenightlymirror)

@8 months ago with 83 notes
#poverty #language 

15,000-Year-Old Words 

nevver:

thou, I, not, that, we, to give, who, this, what, man/male, ye, old, mother, to hear, hand, fire, to pull, black, to flow, bark, ashes, to spit, worm

@11 months ago with 636 notes
#language 
topherchris:

‘Unfollow’ added to Oxford Dictionary Online.

topherchris:

‘Unfollow’ added to Oxford Dictionary Online.

(via cognitivedissonance)

@1 year ago with 809 notes
#tumblr #language 

"For just because nothing is communicated through language, what is communicated in language cannot be externally limited or measured, and therefore all language contains its own incommensurable, uniquely constituted infinity. Its linguistic being, not its verbal meanings, defines its frontier."

Walter Benjamin, ‘On Language as Such and on the Language of Man’  (via aidsnegligee)

(via asthepoemsgo-deactivated2013070)

@1 year ago with 53 notes
#walter benjamin #philosophy #language 

"Language is the fundamental trait in human nature’s hermeneutic relation to the two-fold of presence and present beings."

A Dialogue on Language, Martin Heidegger (via fuckyeahexistentialism)
@1 year ago with 199 notes
#martin heidegger #philosophy #language 
svitoj:

There is a Russian word “toska”, that is not possible to translate into English, but for me   it means: “existential longing for something that does not exist”.

svitoj:

There is a Russian word “toska”, that is not possible to translate into English, but for me   it means: “existential longing for something that does not exist”.

(via ixc3)

@1 year ago with 19 notes
#language 
brainstatic:

This is the English word I want to get tattooed on my wrist. It means “to keep breathing even though the water rises all around you.” English is such a mystical exotic language. They can fit so much meaning into so small a word.

brainstatic:

This is the English word I want to get tattooed on my wrist. It means “to keep breathing even though the water rises all around you.” English is such a mystical exotic language. They can fit so much meaning into so small a word.

(via ralexmox)

@3 months ago with 39209 notes
#language 

"

You find that by dispensing with “is” and by trying to reformulate without “is”, you naturally fall into the kind of expression which is considered acceptable in modern science. And also, it’s the type of consciousness that Zen Buddhism tries to induce. Using E-Prime you will understand modern science and Zen Buddhism both a lot better than you’ve ever understand them before. Martin Gardner has written a long essay proving that to think like this will destroy your mind. I think it adds tremendously to clarity! I am removing the “is” from my writing more and more. Removing it from your speech is even harder.

I started thinking: [to say] “the grass is green” [is to say] “the grass seems green to me.” The saves me a lot of time, by the way. I don’t get embroiled in arguments like “Beethoven is better than Mozart” or “rock is better than soul”. I define such things as meaningless, so when people involved in arguments like that, I think, well, Beethoven seems better to me than Mozart to me most of the time. I don’t say “Beethoven is better than Mozart.”

"

Robert Anton Wilson on “Is”.

(Source: youtube.com)

@7 months ago with 16 notes
#robert anton wilson #language #philosophy #lingustics #e-prime #martin gardner 
@10 months ago with 36426 notes
#language 
@11 months ago with 2447 notes
#language 

Mrs. Byrne's Dictionary of Unusual, Obscure, and Preposterous Words  

nevver:

  1. Omphaloskepsis: meditation while gazing at one’s navel.
  2. Pickedevant: a Van Dyke beard.
  3. Malneirophrenia: depression following a nightmare.
  4. Lissotrichous: having straight hair.
  5. Junkettaceous: frivolous, worthless.
  6. Sinciput: the forehead.
  7. Whigmaleery: a knickknack or a geegaw; a whim.
  8. Cuggermugger: whispered gossiping.
  9. Goubemouche: a gullible person (literally, one who swallows flies).
  10. Kakkorhaphiophobia: fear of failure.
  11. Nibby-jibby: narrow margin; a close call.
  12. Anaphalantiasis: the falling out of the eyebrows.
  13. Quakebuttock: a coward.
  14. Humdudgeon: an imaginary illness or pain; a loud complaint about nothing.
  15. Floccinaucinihilipilification: the categorizing of something as worthless trivia.
more
@1 year ago with 1731 notes
#language 
@1 year ago with 2727 notes
#language 

12 Enjoyable Names for Relatively Common Things  

nevver:

  1. box tent : the plastic table-like item found in pizza boxes
  2. jamais vu : that feeling of seeing something for the first time, even though there’s nothing new about it
  3. paresthesia : that tingling sensation when your foot falls asleep
  4. grawlix : the string of typographical symbols comic strips use to indicate profanity (“$%@!”)
  5. caruncula : the small, triangular pink bump on the inside corner of each eye
  6. badinage : another word for playful banter
  7. rhumba : a group of rattlesnakes
  8. dringle : to waste time by being lazy
  9. agraffe : the wire cage that keeps the cork in a bottle of champagne
  10. wings : those back flaps on a bra
  11. rasher : a single slice of bacon
  12. purlicue : the web between your thumb and forefinger
more
@1 year ago with 6057 notes
#language 
The 39 Worst Words, Phrases, and Parts of Speech of 2013→

nevver:

  • ”#.” R.I.P., early Twitter feature. We’ll bury you next to your friend, the FourSquare check-in.
  • adverbs. Ban all adverbs. They’re mostly just gulp words, really.
  • "all the things."
  • "because [noun]": (i.e. “because science.”)
  • brogurt.” No.
  • classy.
  • "controversial tweet." There’s just no way to make this sound dignified, and besides, it leads to think pieces.
  • "cronut."
  • "crowdsourced."
  • "derp." It’s been an emotional ride, but it’s time to send this one off on the ice floe.
  • "disrupt." Luxury car apps aren’t disruptive.
  • "Donald Trump is considering a run for…" No, he’s not. He just isn’t. And if you’d like to get him unearned publicity, you should at least get some stock options out of it.
  • "doubled down." Unless the candidate did it while biting into a delicious sandwich, let’s just say the candidate “reaffirmed his/her position” on transportation funding or burrito drones or whatever we’ll be discussing in 2014.
  • "…favorited a tweet you were mentioned in." No one has ever wanted to know this.
  • "gaffe.” It’s going to be a long-enough election year as it is.
  • "game-changer." What you’re describing probably won’t change the game. But if it does, would you want to spoil the moment with a cliche?
  • "Guy Fieri." What if we all decided to just never mention him again? Would he disappear?
  • "hashtag." This refers to the spoken utterance of the word “hashtag,” often accompanied by air-quotes. People can see you doing this.
  • "hipster. Wearing glasses is not something people do because they’re hipsters; it’s something people do because they’re nearsighted. People don’t drink hot chocolate because it’s a hipster thing to do; they drink hot chocolate because it’s literally liquid chocolate. Yes, I wrote “literally.” That’s what happens when you use a word so casually and carelessly in think pieces as to render it meaningless.
  • "I can’t even." You can. Dig deep. Find your Kentucky.
  • "impact." (When used as a verb.)
  • "…in .gifs."
  • "…in one chart." We’re aiming high in 2014. Two chart minimum!
  • "listicle." This is the last one.
  • "literally the worst." Actually, while we’re at it, let’s ban "literally." Literally is the "not the Onion" of fake things.
  • "millennial." Young people are living with their parents because their parents’ generation destroyed the global economy. Next.
  • "nondescript office park." As opposed to the Frank Gehry ones.
  • "not the Onion.
  • "Rethuglicans, Repugs," "Republikkkans," "Demoncrats," "Dumbocrats," and every other variation thereof. Please just use the normal proper nouns; you can add whatever modifier you like before or after.
  • "selfie." But what do they tell us about our society, in the digital now? Let’s ask James Franco.
  • "Snowfall." (In the future, a high-cost digital production that doesn’t live up to the hype shall be known as a "Skyfall.")
  • "the Internets." This was a George W. Bush joke or something, right? You can still use the Internet—just drop the “s.”
  • "This Town."
  • "thought leader." Mostly beaten out of existence, but don’t think we didn’t notice that Paul Allen interview, Wired. You’re on notice.
  • #YOLO. Seriously.

3 months ago
#language 
brainstatic:

This is the English word I want to get tattooed on my wrist. It means “to keep breathing even though the water rises all around you.” English is such a mystical exotic language. They can fit so much meaning into so small a word.
3 months ago
#language 
Free language eBooks→

tyadorborlu:

thelanguagecommunity:

A library of eBooks for Vietnamese, Cantonese, Malay-Indonesian, Finnish, Estonian, Georgian, Amharic, Ethiopian, Arabic, Turkish, Persian, Greek, Welsh, Gaelic, German, Polish, Russian, Romanian, Spanish, Catalan, Basque and French and more.

THIS IS SO BRILLIANT

(via gresa)

4 months ago
#language #education 
"

You find that by dispensing with “is” and by trying to reformulate without “is”, you naturally fall into the kind of expression which is considered acceptable in modern science. And also, it’s the type of consciousness that Zen Buddhism tries to induce. Using E-Prime you will understand modern science and Zen Buddhism both a lot better than you’ve ever understand them before. Martin Gardner has written a long essay proving that to think like this will destroy your mind. I think it adds tremendously to clarity! I am removing the “is” from my writing more and more. Removing it from your speech is even harder.

I started thinking: [to say] “the grass is green” [is to say] “the grass seems green to me.” The saves me a lot of time, by the way. I don’t get embroiled in arguments like “Beethoven is better than Mozart” or “rock is better than soul”. I define such things as meaningless, so when people involved in arguments like that, I think, well, Beethoven seems better to me than Mozart to me most of the time. I don’t say “Beethoven is better than Mozart.”

"
Robert Anton Wilson on “Is”.

(Source: youtube.com)

7 months ago
#robert anton wilson #language #philosophy #lingustics #e-prime #martin gardner 
"Sanskrit has ninety-six words for love; ancient Persian has eighty, Greek three, and English only one. This is indicative of the poverty of awareness or emphasis that we give to that tremendously important realm of feeling. Eskimos have thirty words for snow, because it is a life-and death matter to them to have exact information about the element they live with so intimately. If we had a vocabulary of thirty words for love … we would immediately be richer and more intelligent in this human element so close to our heart. An Eskimo probably would die of clumsiness if he had only one word for snow; we are close to dying of loneliness because we have only one word for love. Of all the Western languages, English may be the most lacking when it come to feeling."

Robert Johnson, Fisher King

I love you in America is drenched with the smell of sex or the wisps of longing for another person echoing it back to you. 

I’ve chocked back so many I love you’s from fear of misinterpretation from friends, crushes, supervisors. 

Sometimes I love delicately, sometimes I love violently, but always I love, am full of love.

(via dishabillic)

(via thenightlymirror)

8 months ago
#poverty #language 
10 months ago
#language 
15,000-Year-Old Words→

nevver:

thou, I, not, that, we, to give, who, this, what, man/male, ye, old, mother, to hear, hand, fire, to pull, black, to flow, bark, ashes, to spit, worm

11 months ago
#language 
11 months ago
#language 
topherchris:

‘Unfollow’ added to Oxford Dictionary Online.
1 year ago
#tumblr #language 
Mrs. Byrne's Dictionary of Unusual, Obscure, and Preposterous Words →

nevver:

  1. Omphaloskepsis: meditation while gazing at one’s navel.
  2. Pickedevant: a Van Dyke beard.
  3. Malneirophrenia: depression following a nightmare.
  4. Lissotrichous: having straight hair.
  5. Junkettaceous: frivolous, worthless.
  6. Sinciput: the forehead.
  7. Whigmaleery: a knickknack or a geegaw; a whim.
  8. Cuggermugger: whispered gossiping.
  9. Goubemouche: a gullible person (literally, one who swallows flies).
  10. Kakkorhaphiophobia: fear of failure.
  11. Nibby-jibby: narrow margin; a close call.
  12. Anaphalantiasis: the falling out of the eyebrows.
  13. Quakebuttock: a coward.
  14. Humdudgeon: an imaginary illness or pain; a loud complaint about nothing.
  15. Floccinaucinihilipilification: the categorizing of something as worthless trivia.
more
1 year ago
#language 
"For just because nothing is communicated through language, what is communicated in language cannot be externally limited or measured, and therefore all language contains its own incommensurable, uniquely constituted infinity. Its linguistic being, not its verbal meanings, defines its frontier."
Walter Benjamin, ‘On Language as Such and on the Language of Man’  (via aidsnegligee)

(via asthepoemsgo-deactivated2013070)

1 year ago
#walter benjamin #philosophy #language 
1 year ago
#language 
"Language is the fundamental trait in human nature’s hermeneutic relation to the two-fold of presence and present beings."
A Dialogue on Language, Martin Heidegger (via fuckyeahexistentialism)
1 year ago
#martin heidegger #philosophy #language 
12 Enjoyable Names for Relatively Common Things →

nevver:

  1. box tent : the plastic table-like item found in pizza boxes
  2. jamais vu : that feeling of seeing something for the first time, even though there’s nothing new about it
  3. paresthesia : that tingling sensation when your foot falls asleep
  4. grawlix : the string of typographical symbols comic strips use to indicate profanity (“$%@!”)
  5. caruncula : the small, triangular pink bump on the inside corner of each eye
  6. badinage : another word for playful banter
  7. rhumba : a group of rattlesnakes
  8. dringle : to waste time by being lazy
  9. agraffe : the wire cage that keeps the cork in a bottle of champagne
  10. wings : those back flaps on a bra
  11. rasher : a single slice of bacon
  12. purlicue : the web between your thumb and forefinger
more
1 year ago
#language 
svitoj:

There is a Russian word “toska”, that is not possible to translate into English, but for me   it means: “existential longing for something that does not exist”.
1 year ago
#language