Defining modern dictatorship and its overthrow 

In the December of 2001, the severe macroeconomic financial crisis in Argentina eventually forced President Fernando de la Rúa, who was implementing severe IMF-directed cuts to public spending and taxes rises onto the majority Argentines, out of office. The civil unrest surrounding the presidential palace was so severe, it required the president to unceremoniously leave his post via helicopter, in frightened exile of the nation’s wrath, disgust and revolt. The cause of the crisis itself essentially lay in the ethically dubious priorities of Argentina’s prior governments. Prior President Carlos Menem granted large tax cuts to corporations who lobbied in his favour, creating a massive budget shortfall and inflation. Like the current IMF-demanded technocracies implementing austerity’s social devastation and stratification in Southern Europe, the de la Rúa administration acted on the unelected auspecies of IMF dictact to implement the neoliberal preservation of corporate monopoly. Argentines themselves rejected this directly, with intellectual resentment.

The Egyptian revolution of 2011 is mostly covered and discussed in the media with a one-dimensional lack of context. The basic perception is that Egyptians found the bravery to take to the streets against the Mubarak dictatorship, and it was eventually overthrown with the support of western powers. But the conditions involved are much more awkwardly condemning and nuanced than this. As Noam Chomsky documents:  "Mubarak’s neoliberal programs since the early 80s have created wast wealth in small sectors and have engendered a huge corruption, severely harming a large majority of population. As inequality soared, all of this was, not surprisingly, accompanied by increasingly brutal repression of workers and others who sought elementary rights. But, virtually up to the moment of outburst of Arab spring, the World bank and IMF were issuing glowing reports on the remarkable achievement of such a system and Egypt’s economic and political managers.” 

We can judge that the majority of those involved in the anti-government protest movements in Egypt were generally unideological in their motives. They were mainly reacting in sociological rage and desperation to the injustice and despair imposed upon them for decades by Hosni Mubarak’s neoliberalism, and its privatizations, social stratification and suppression of the rights of workers. It received approval and support from many western corporations, governments and arms companies for these reasons, support of which was only withdrawn when the position of the Mubarak regime became entirely untenable on an accountably political, but not moral level.

(Source: jjarichardson.blogspot.com)

@2 years ago
#blog post #dictatorship #neoliberalism #egypt #mubarak #revolution #politics 
apsies:

theatlantic:

Hosni Mubarak kicks it with U.S. Presidents
Apparently, Mubarak doesn’t age.

There are many reasons why I don’t trust this Mubarak character, this is one of them.

apsies:

theatlantic:

Hosni Mubarak kicks it with U.S. Presidents

Apparently, Mubarak doesn’t age.

There are many reasons why I don’t trust this Mubarak character, this is one of them.

(via think4yourself)

@2 years ago with 57 notes
#mubarak #egypt #politics 

Mubarak and sons to stand trial in August  

Hosni Mubarak, the former Egyptian president, and his two sons will go on trial starting August 3 in a Cairo criminal court for graft and for their role in killing protesters, Egyptian state news agency has said.

A court official said Mubarak will be tried on charges of corruption and intentionally killing protesters during the 18-day uprising that ended his 30-year rule on February 11, the Middle East News Agency reported on Wednesday.

(Source: newsflick, via theatlantic)

@2 years ago with 1090 notes
#egypt #mubarak #revolution #politics 

Egypt in flux: sober realities and optimism 100 days after Mubarak’s fall

guardian:

Photograph: Sean Smith for the Guardian

Photograph: Sean Smith for the Guardian

Energised by the Tahrir Square revolt, Egyptians are now struggling to cast a new political mould for the country

@2 years ago with 7 notes
#egypt #mubarak #revolution 

"I took a class at the American University in Cairo. It (was) called ‘The Social Mobilization Under Authoritarian Regime.’ It was good."

Egyptian political activist GIGI IBRAHIM — @gsquare86 on Twitter — on how she became involved in the revolution that overthrew Hosni Mubarak, on The Daily Show. (via inothernews)
@2 years ago with 53 notes
#education #mubarak #egypt #revolution 

"

With tensions rising between Egypt’s military rulers and demonstrators, the authorities here took a major step toward satisfying the protesters’ demands for retribution against Hosni Mubarak, ordering the detention of the former president and his two sons.

The detention, announced by a prosecutor appointed by Mr. Mubarak before his ouster in February, represents a breathtaking reversal for Egypt’s former strongman, whose grip seemed so unshakable just three months ago that some thought he could hand over power directly to his son Gamal.

The three will be questioned about corruption and abuse of power during Mr. Mubarak’s three-decade rule, the authorities said Wednesday. The Egyptian Health Ministry has said that more than 800 people were killed during the 18-day revolt that ended Mr. Mubarak’s rule.

The detention is also the latest twist in the unfinished story of a revolution that became a touchstone for the broader Arab Spring. The military officers who seized power and pledged a transition to democracy after Mr. Mubarak stepped down have faced escalating street protests calling for his prosecution and, increasingly, criticism for the slow pace of political reforms.

The military has cracked down with mounting force, beating and torturing as many as 200 protesters over the last several weeks and killing two in a clash early on Saturday, rights groups say. On Wednesday some human rights activists complained that the transitional government’s actions against the Mubaraks and many of their top allies risked perpetuating the pattern of extralegal and politically motivated detentions under the Mubarak government.

"

@3 years ago with 20 notes
#mubarak #egypt #revolution 

A Reminder: Mubarak Isn't the Only U.S.-Backed Dictator 

The United States’ relationship with Hosni Mubarak has been spotlighted recently as Egyptian protesters and American commentators question the Obama administration’s support of a president clearly opposed to the will of the people. Salon’s Justin Elliott has understandably decided this a good time to step back and take a look at some of the other repressive dictatorships supported by the American government. He offers a sample of some of America’s friends with the worst human rights records: Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Equitorial Guinea.

The Saudi Arabian government, for example, ignores the rights of its female and Shi’a citizens as well as its foreign workers. Human Rights Watch is seriously concerned with the Saudi government’s prohibition of free expression, movement and association “as well as a pervasive lack of accountability.” Still, the United States is planning to sell the Saudis “84 F-15 fighter aircraft and almost 200 helicopters, as well as trainers, simulators, generators, spare and repair parts, and other related elements of program support, according to CNN.”

Jordan, on the other hand, received $300 million in military aid from the United States just last year. Jordan is also on Human Rights Watch’s radar, where police torture is pervasive and free speech and government criticism are forbidden by law.

(Source: azspot)

@3 years ago with 75 notes
#politics #dictatorship #mubarak 
motherjones:

Wow. Narcissistic US politicians have so much to learn!
howtotalktogirlsatparties:

Oh hey, Mubarak. Nice pinstripes. Wait, what? Oh shit, those pinstripes are actually your name spelled over and over again. You’re a douche, no doubt, but that is some serious despot swag.

motherjones:

Wow. Narcissistic US politicians have so much to learn!

howtotalktogirlsatparties:

Oh hey, Mubarak. Nice pinstripes. Wait, what? Oh shit, those pinstripes are actually your name spelled over and over again. You’re a douche, no doubt, but that is some serious despot swag.

@2 years ago with 5407 notes
#egypt #mubarak 

AP: Former Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak in a coma

(Source: inothernews)

@2 years ago with 41 notes
#mubarak #egypt 

"

Egypt’s top prosecutor on Tuesday ordered former President Hosni Mubarak to stand trial in connection with the killing of unarmed protesters during the 18-day-revolt that forced him from power, yielding to one of the revolution’s top demands just days before many of its organizers had vowed to return to Tahrir Square for another day of protest.

In a statement, Egyptian prosecutor Mahmoud Abdel-Meguid said he would also charge Mr. Mubarak and his two sons, Gamal and Alaa, with corruption and self-dealing. The prosecutor also plans to file charges against a businessman close to the family, Hussein Salem Among other ventures, Mr. Salem was part owner of a company involved in an Egyptian government deal to sell natural gas to Israel that is now under investigation..

The announcement of the trials on the eve of the four-month mark of the Jan. 25 revolution — which was made by a prosecutor Mr. Mubarak appointed, under the direction of an interim government headed by his former defense minister —is the clearest indication yet that the Egyptian authorities are moving to satisfy the public demand for retribution against the Mubarak family even before the parliamentary elections expected this fall.

Mr. Mubarak, 83, has been under indefinite detention while recovering from a heart attack in a hospital near his Sharm el-Sheik home. His sons are in a Cairo jail along with over a dozen other figures from the Mubarak regime. But until now no charges were filed. Early reports Tuesday from the official Egyptian news services had said the Mubarak sons would also be charged in connection with the deaths of the protesters, a prospect that was not ultimately mentioned in the prosecutor’s written statement.

"

@2 years ago with 23 notes
#egypt #mubarak #revolution #politics 

Egypt 100 days after the revolution: ‘A mini-Mubarak in every institution’

guardian:

One hundred days after the fall of Hosni Mubarak, Egypt’s prospects are clouded by insecurity, economic worries and sectarian violence. Four Egyptians outline their views of their post-revolutionary country

@2 years ago with 9 notes
#egypt #mubarak #politics #revolution 

Hosni Mubarak detained over corruption allegations

guardian:

Photograph: DENNIS BRACK/POOL/EPA

Former Egyptian president’s arrest follows detention of his two sons on Tuesday night

@3 years ago with 26 notes
#egypt #revolution #mubarak 

Egyptian TV also says Mubarak has been admitted to an intensive care unit. -Reuters 

(Source: neighborhoodr-cairo, via soupsoup)

@3 years ago with 19 notes
#mubarak #egypt #revolution 
newsflick:

The British prime minister David Cameron, left, with the Egyptian defense minister Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, following their meeting in Cairo on Monday. (via nytimes)

The British prime minister, David Cameron, held talks in Cairo on Monday with military and civilian leaders, becoming the highest-ranking foreign leader to visit Egypt since a popular uprising ousted the long-time president, Hosni Mubarak. (source)




David Cameron condemns brutal suppression of protest and resistance in the middle east. He excuses it in his own country.

newsflick:

The British prime minister David Cameron, left, with the Egyptian defense minister Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, following their meeting in Cairo on Monday. (via nytimes)

The British prime minister, David Cameron, held talks in Cairo on Monday with military and civilian leaders, becoming the highest-ranking foreign leader to visit Egypt since a popular uprising ousted the long-time president, Hosni Mubarak. (source)

David Cameron condemns brutal suppression of protest and resistance in the middle east. He excuses it in his own country.

(Source: newsflick, via soupsoup)

@3 years ago with 694 notes
#david cameron #egypt #revolution #politics #mubarak 
Defining modern dictatorship and its overthrow→
In the December of 2001, the severe macroeconomic financial crisis in Argentina eventually forced President Fernando de la Rúa, who was implementing severe IMF-directed cuts to public spending and taxes rises onto the majority Argentines, out of office. The civil unrest surrounding the presidential palace was so severe, it required the president to unceremoniously leave his post via helicopter, in frightened exile of the nation’s wrath, disgust and revolt. The cause of the crisis itself essentially lay in the ethically dubious priorities of Argentina’s prior governments. Prior President Carlos Menem granted large tax cuts to corporations who lobbied in his favour, creating a massive budget shortfall and inflation. Like the current IMF-demanded technocracies implementing austerity’s social devastation and stratification in Southern Europe, the de la Rúa administration acted on the unelected auspecies of IMF dictact to implement the neoliberal preservation of corporate monopoly. Argentines themselves rejected this directly, with intellectual resentment.

The Egyptian revolution of 2011 is mostly covered and discussed in the media with a one-dimensional lack of context. The basic perception is that Egyptians found the bravery to take to the streets against the Mubarak dictatorship, and it was eventually overthrown with the support of western powers. But the conditions involved are much more awkwardly condemning and nuanced than this. As Noam Chomsky documents:  "Mubarak’s neoliberal programs since the early 80s have created wast wealth in small sectors and have engendered a huge corruption, severely harming a large majority of population. As inequality soared, all of this was, not surprisingly, accompanied by increasingly brutal repression of workers and others who sought elementary rights. But, virtually up to the moment of outburst of Arab spring, the World bank and IMF were issuing glowing reports on the remarkable achievement of such a system and Egypt’s economic and political managers.” 

We can judge that the majority of those involved in the anti-government protest movements in Egypt were generally unideological in their motives. They were mainly reacting in sociological rage and desperation to the injustice and despair imposed upon them for decades by Hosni Mubarak’s neoliberalism, and its privatizations, social stratification and suppression of the rights of workers. It received approval and support from many western corporations, governments and arms companies for these reasons, support of which was only withdrawn when the position of the Mubarak regime became entirely untenable on an accountably political, but not moral level.

(Source: jjarichardson.blogspot.com)

2 years ago
#blog post #dictatorship #neoliberalism #egypt #mubarak #revolution #politics 
motherjones:

Wow. Narcissistic US politicians have so much to learn!
howtotalktogirlsatparties:

Oh hey, Mubarak. Nice pinstripes. Wait, what? Oh shit, those pinstripes are actually your name spelled over and over again. You’re a douche, no doubt, but that is some serious despot swag.
2 years ago
#egypt #mubarak 
apsies:

theatlantic:

Hosni Mubarak kicks it with U.S. Presidents
Apparently, Mubarak doesn’t age.

There are many reasons why I don’t trust this Mubarak character, this is one of them.
2 years ago
#mubarak #egypt #politics 
AP: Former Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak in a coma

(Source: inothernews)

2 years ago
#mubarak #egypt 
Mubarak and sons to stand trial in August →

Hosni Mubarak, the former Egyptian president, and his two sons will go on trial starting August 3 in a Cairo criminal court for graft and for their role in killing protesters, Egyptian state news agency has said.

A court official said Mubarak will be tried on charges of corruption and intentionally killing protesters during the 18-day uprising that ended his 30-year rule on February 11, the Middle East News Agency reported on Wednesday.

(Source: newsflick, via theatlantic)

2 years ago
#egypt #mubarak #revolution #politics 
"

Egypt’s top prosecutor on Tuesday ordered former President Hosni Mubarak to stand trial in connection with the killing of unarmed protesters during the 18-day-revolt that forced him from power, yielding to one of the revolution’s top demands just days before many of its organizers had vowed to return to Tahrir Square for another day of protest.

In a statement, Egyptian prosecutor Mahmoud Abdel-Meguid said he would also charge Mr. Mubarak and his two sons, Gamal and Alaa, with corruption and self-dealing. The prosecutor also plans to file charges against a businessman close to the family, Hussein Salem Among other ventures, Mr. Salem was part owner of a company involved in an Egyptian government deal to sell natural gas to Israel that is now under investigation..

The announcement of the trials on the eve of the four-month mark of the Jan. 25 revolution — which was made by a prosecutor Mr. Mubarak appointed, under the direction of an interim government headed by his former defense minister —is the clearest indication yet that the Egyptian authorities are moving to satisfy the public demand for retribution against the Mubarak family even before the parliamentary elections expected this fall.

Mr. Mubarak, 83, has been under indefinite detention while recovering from a heart attack in a hospital near his Sharm el-Sheik home. His sons are in a Cairo jail along with over a dozen other figures from the Mubarak regime. But until now no charges were filed. Early reports Tuesday from the official Egyptian news services had said the Mubarak sons would also be charged in connection with the deaths of the protesters, a prospect that was not ultimately mentioned in the prosecutor’s written statement.

"
2 years ago
#egypt #mubarak #revolution #politics 
Egypt in flux: sober realities and optimism 100 days after Mubarak’s fall

guardian:

Photograph: Sean Smith for the Guardian

Photograph: Sean Smith for the Guardian

Energised by the Tahrir Square revolt, Egyptians are now struggling to cast a new political mould for the country

2 years ago
#egypt #mubarak #revolution 
Egypt 100 days after the revolution: ‘A mini-Mubarak in every institution’

guardian:

One hundred days after the fall of Hosni Mubarak, Egypt’s prospects are clouded by insecurity, economic worries and sectarian violence. Four Egyptians outline their views of their post-revolutionary country

2 years ago
#egypt #mubarak #politics #revolution 
"I took a class at the American University in Cairo. It (was) called ‘The Social Mobilization Under Authoritarian Regime.’ It was good."
Egyptian political activist GIGI IBRAHIM — @gsquare86 on Twitter — on how she became involved in the revolution that overthrew Hosni Mubarak, on The Daily Show. (via inothernews)
2 years ago
#education #mubarak #egypt #revolution 
Hosni Mubarak detained over corruption allegations

guardian:

Photograph: DENNIS BRACK/POOL/EPA

Former Egyptian president’s arrest follows detention of his two sons on Tuesday night

3 years ago
#egypt #revolution #mubarak 
"

With tensions rising between Egypt’s military rulers and demonstrators, the authorities here took a major step toward satisfying the protesters’ demands for retribution against Hosni Mubarak, ordering the detention of the former president and his two sons.

The detention, announced by a prosecutor appointed by Mr. Mubarak before his ouster in February, represents a breathtaking reversal for Egypt’s former strongman, whose grip seemed so unshakable just three months ago that some thought he could hand over power directly to his son Gamal.

The three will be questioned about corruption and abuse of power during Mr. Mubarak’s three-decade rule, the authorities said Wednesday. The Egyptian Health Ministry has said that more than 800 people were killed during the 18-day revolt that ended Mr. Mubarak’s rule.

The detention is also the latest twist in the unfinished story of a revolution that became a touchstone for the broader Arab Spring. The military officers who seized power and pledged a transition to democracy after Mr. Mubarak stepped down have faced escalating street protests calling for his prosecution and, increasingly, criticism for the slow pace of political reforms.

The military has cracked down with mounting force, beating and torturing as many as 200 protesters over the last several weeks and killing two in a clash early on Saturday, rights groups say. On Wednesday some human rights activists complained that the transitional government’s actions against the Mubaraks and many of their top allies risked perpetuating the pattern of extralegal and politically motivated detentions under the Mubarak government.

"
3 years ago
#mubarak #egypt #revolution 
Egyptian TV also says Mubarak has been admitted to an intensive care unit. -Reuters→

(Source: neighborhoodr-cairo, via soupsoup)

3 years ago
#mubarak #egypt #revolution 
A Reminder: Mubarak Isn't the Only U.S.-Backed Dictator→

The United States’ relationship with Hosni Mubarak has been spotlighted recently as Egyptian protesters and American commentators question the Obama administration’s support of a president clearly opposed to the will of the people. Salon’s Justin Elliott has understandably decided this a good time to step back and take a look at some of the other repressive dictatorships supported by the American government. He offers a sample of some of America’s friends with the worst human rights records: Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Equitorial Guinea.

The Saudi Arabian government, for example, ignores the rights of its female and Shi’a citizens as well as its foreign workers. Human Rights Watch is seriously concerned with the Saudi government’s prohibition of free expression, movement and association “as well as a pervasive lack of accountability.” Still, the United States is planning to sell the Saudis “84 F-15 fighter aircraft and almost 200 helicopters, as well as trainers, simulators, generators, spare and repair parts, and other related elements of program support, according to CNN.”

Jordan, on the other hand, received $300 million in military aid from the United States just last year. Jordan is also on Human Rights Watch’s radar, where police torture is pervasive and free speech and government criticism are forbidden by law.

(Source: azspot)

3 years ago
#politics #dictatorship #mubarak 
newsflick:

The British prime minister David Cameron, left, with the Egyptian defense minister Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, following their meeting in Cairo on Monday. (via nytimes)

The British prime minister, David Cameron, held talks in Cairo on Monday with military and civilian leaders, becoming the highest-ranking foreign leader to visit Egypt since a popular uprising ousted the long-time president, Hosni Mubarak. (source)




David Cameron condemns brutal suppression of protest and resistance in the middle east. He excuses it in his own country.
3 years ago
#david cameron #egypt #revolution #politics #mubarak